"Quo iter facit Corinna?"

Translation:To where does Corinna make a journey?

August 27, 2019

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cephandrius16

"Where is Corrina travelling to" and
"Where does Corinna travel to" were marked incorrect.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Have you reported?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cephandrius16

No I didn't report these.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tc2018

Same for "Where does Corinna travel to?".

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Yep - I had the same problem with tiles..."Where" was capitalised, so I went with the bad English grammar, and tried "travel" rather than "make a journey". Got marked wrong and told it should have been: Where does Corinna make a journey to?

Strange to come here and find they're expecting the translation I wanted to give!

Reported. I'm sure it will be fixed :o)

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Why would that be bad English grammar?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Firstly, make a journey is not a phrase generally used in English - at least not in Britain (I'm a native); I can't comment with authority on US/Oz/NZ/Canadian/etc. forms of English.

Secondly: ending a sentence with a preposition is bad English, and ending one with "to" sounds particularly unpleasant.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Make a journey is a common phrase in American English.

Ending a sentence in a preposition is not an error. You will not find that rule in any modern grammar book or style guide.

Just because something sounds unpleasant to you doesn't make it wrong.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Hi Daniel,

I'm from California and I have never heard anyone say "make a journey" before. I was almost going to report it when I first saw it, but I looked it up and did find one case in an online dictionary. I certainly wouldn't call it "common" though. The translation here, "To where does Corinna make a journey?" sounds really strange to me. I am not complaining, literal translations are fine with me and it seems pretty doubtful there will ever be an English from Latin course for native Latin-speaking zombies. =D

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

I never heard make a journey in American English and I´ve lived in the States for 22 years. Must be regional? I am from the Northeast

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

I'm also from the Northeast. I've heard it from New York to Wisconsin, down to Kentucky. It's even used in one of my Latin textbooks as a translation for iter facere :)

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

I've heard "make a journey," but probably not a lot.

I would be more inclined to say "take/make a long trip" or even "travel a long way."

I think insincere talking heads in entertainment and sports TV have been making "journey" -- the collection of one's life experiences -- a roll-my-eyes moment for a few years now. (I'm doing it now reading my own sentence.)

So, that probably doubles my aversion to the use of "journey" anywhere else now.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

I had not noticed it used in US English books and films; is it more common in particular areas of the US?

I notice that you are learning (US) English. What is your mother-tongue?

Here's one that shows it is the correct formal form: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/prepositions

I was taught in both school (primary and secondary) and university that prepositions are not to be used to end a sentence.

Note: I didn't state the obvious point that hanging (or stranded) prepositions are used in informal speech. My comment was only about formal writing/speech, and necessarily about British English.

I used unpleasant in the same way I would say that spoiled milk tastes unpleasant - it is the taste/feeling/reaction that indicates something is wrong, and that knowledge of wrongness is based on previous learning. I have a similar reaction to mis-spellings - it's probably a form of synesthesia, a condition I enjoy.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

I'm a native speaker of English. I also teach Latin and ESL, so I'm fairly well versed in grammar.

From the link you provided:

"Traditional grammatical rules say that we should not have a preposition at the end of a clause or sentence. However, we sometimes do separate a preposition from the words which follow it (its complement). This is called preposition stranding, and it is common in informal styles"

This course is not exclusively formal language, so it's not an error or bad English grammar.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

I've lived all my live (56 years) in the US, and I don't remember ever having heard "make a journey". But I do agree about the correctness of ending an English sentence with a preposition. The rule not to do so was made up by the same people who decided that "splitting an infinitive" (i.e. saying "to really want") was incorrect—namely, priggish Latin scholars.

So the moral of this story is: Study Latin, enjoy Latin, revel in Latin, but don't mistake Latin grammar for English, and certainly don't try to restrict English to operate in the way Latin operates. Latin didn't split its infinitives because Latin speakers couldn't do it. If they could have, they likely would have.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulBarbee

Make a journey is really weird in American English too.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSewell1

"Where is Corinna making a journey to?" was not accepted.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

I plugged that one in just to see what would happen. I've reported it.

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

Honestly, this entire section wants you to shoehorn "make a journey" into every English translation. It's not just this one; every example in the section should be updated to include, you know, real ways that English speakers might say things.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bewoke123

"Where does Corinna make a journey to?" is this incorrect?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

According to the owl, it should be correct. Most of us think it sounds really strange though!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7ga4Ktv4

isn't this just saying where is corinna going to? or is there a different way of saying that in latin?

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Iter is a journey, so this is more specific. She isn't walking to the other side of the villa.

September 14, 2019
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