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  5. "Corinna est femina."

"Corinna est femina."

Translation:Corinna is a woman.

August 27, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewDaher

I think 'femina' is pronounced incorrectly here. Wiktionary lists the word as "fēmina", with a long 'e', short 'i' and stress on the first syllable. The speaker seems to say "femīna", with a short 'e', long 'i' and stress on the second syllable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Please report this with the button in the lesson, not in the sentence discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cervido

This comment is exactly right. I wish macrons were included in Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, yes, yes, yes!!!! Definitely mandatory to learn the right way. Because we haven't a real teacher in the flesh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuTienTse

I want to know what Latin I am learning on Duolingo. Is it Classical Latin, Vulgar Latin, Ecclesiastical Latin or else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regnahw

I know isn't the ecclesiastical one...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

The page where you signed up for Latin says that this is supposed to be Classical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Could someone highlight from time to time the differences? I'm eager to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girv98

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA/Latin

This should help with the pronunciation differences, given you know a bit of IPA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayduprez

Shouldn't the verb be placed at the end of the sentence : "Corinna femina est." or simply "Corinna femina"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Yes, Latin is SOV and so usually the verb tends to come at the end. But in addition to Latin having relatively flexible word order, "esse (to be)" is a stative verb and there is no object here, just a subject complement, and therefore everything is in the nominative. It is not unusual to see SVC here, Subject-Verb-Complement.

That said, "Corinna femina est" should not be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Could it be "Corinna is female" if Corinna is a cat for instance. Because "femina" can be a female in Latin, or woman. Mulier is only woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anecjoan

Is Corinna a Latin name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is Corinna a Latin name?

Originally Greek -- the name of a poet: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corinna

It was also used in Latin, e.g. by Ovid in his Amores: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amores_(Ovid)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vranasgatmi

if i may ask. what is the difference between butting femina before the est and behind the est. are both sentances correct? [name] femina est [name] est femina


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girv98

Both are fine and mean essentially the same thing. From my experience, 'est' placed between the two is the most common (at least when used as a copula).

Word order can impart some nuances, depending on the sentence; Though in this case, I'd say it's mainly down to preference.

If you want to go into greater detail, you can read here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_word_order

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_word_order#The_verb_%22to_be%22


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MEELOOSH

It keeps flip flopping over if my answer has a typo or if it is completely incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlMusgra

I get dinged on a typo for the name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

The correction algorithm allows a maximum of one wrong letter per word to slide by as a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeff425993

Why if i am correct ,am i marked wrong !!!??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

You probably had a typo or extra space somewhere that you didn't see. You need to share your answer with us so we can see what happened.

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