"I feel poorly."

Translation:Me male habeo.

August 27, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I feel "poorly?" I had to look that one up. Apparently the British do use it to say they aren't feeling well. In the USA most people would say *"I feel bad."

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethAnne01

We do indeed say 'poorly'; for me, 'I feel bad' would imply I have a bad 'conscience' rather than I'm feeling ill.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

In the U.S. I think "I feel bad" (and "feel badly") refers to conscience or to sympathy -- e.g., "I feel bad for her." But "poorly" is never used in American English to refer to health. Those of us who do know it in that context, it's either due to BBC or BritLit. If an American wants to say, "I feel poorly", we would say, "I feel ill/sick/unwell." A very formal American might say, "I did poorly on that exam" but his listeners would likely think he sounded odd.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunalui

Exactly

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerryH1958

Alas, in America we firmly resist "to feel poorly" because it is the equivalent of using "to see poorly" to mean one's vision doesn't work. In that case, "to feel poorly" means one's fingers are broken. "I feel sick" was my default, and it was rejected. An additional option or two would be appreciated, and here is my hope that this is the worst concern that ever arises on this excellent site.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

"I feel sick" was my default, and it was rejected.

This is where you flag it in-lesson and report "My answer should be accepted."

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

It is still correct

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorvoGerbe

For this USA english is superior to British English ^^

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosHenrq

Is "Male ma habeo" correct?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Not ma. Me. "Male me habeo" is correct. :)

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosHenrq

Oh, thank. :) (And "ma" was a typo)

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaeLoecke

what would be he difference between "me" and "ego" in this case

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

It is the accusative case of "ego." Think of the structure as the reflexive verb system you see in Spanish/French/Italian, etc.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceClark8

How do we discern the difference between the habeo use and the ago use?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msmarko

It's now too forgiving. I wrote - Me habet male - and it says i made a typo. No. I just got it wrong. Thanks anyway.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunalui

I believe that's just the way the system works, not only for Latin. It is probably just unable to differentiate between irrelevant typos and serious ones. I guess the way it works is as follows: it considers something like the ratio 'number of wrong letters' over 'length of the word' and if the result is less than some fixed threshold you get a typo, else it's a mistake.

I'd say the number of actual mistakes I get away with is roughly the same as the number of times I have an answer refused because of some silly typo, so I'm fine with the system as it is, as I suspect that improving it could be hard.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asphodelie

That's my reasoning too! I think it kind of evens out. Just today I missed something in Spanish because I got one letter of someone's name wrong (an insignificant typo, IMO!) but I also had a really glaring error in verb conjugation forgiven in Latin as a "typo," so I'm calling it equal. :)

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Usually typos that result in real words are counted as incorrect, whilst single letter typos which result in non-words are forgiven. However, single letter typos in Latin seem to be forgiven...atm!!

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

I honestly don't know if this is a deep-level coding issue from the devs or a database entry issue from the course contributors. I have made typos where I put "tu est" instead of "tu es" and it forgave me as a typo instead of marking me wrong the way I would expect it to.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edo_farias

so "habeo" can be translated like "have" and like "feel" right?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

habeō, habēre, habuī, habitum

Means, primarily, "to have, hold" and has meanings stemming from that.

sē habēre is an idiomatic expression. It's the only time you'd see habeō as "feel."

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

I've caught on to this idiom via the unit, but I don't recall seeing it much in literature??

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oryctos

I write "ego me male habeo" but it give me error.

Is it really wrong?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThemistoclesL

Of course not. You certainly could use 'ego' at the start of the sentence, without any change in the meaning obviously.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

There is a change in the meaning. It's a subtle one, but it's there. It would be like putting the pronoun 'I' in italics, and usually would only be used in a contrast with someone else.

Speaker 1: Me bene habeo.

Speaker 2: Ego me male habeo.

The 'ego' there would have the force of 'but I, on the other hand.'

The Romans just didn't use the pronouns unless there was a compelling reason to. And that tells you there is a change of meaning, even if it is only in tone.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThemistoclesL

Indeed you're right. But in our case, with non dialogue or context around the phrase, one cannot tell the difference. So, shouldn't both options be considered equally suitable?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

I think both should be offered as correct answers, absolutely.

I do think, though, that the default Duolingo should be pushing would be closer to the word order and standard usage. Maybe a note at the bottom beyond "Another possible translation."

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunalui

Just report that your answer should be accepted and it will be added to the possible correct one (if that's not already the case).

Indeed, although there is a different emphasis if the subject pronoun is present, here it is sometimes present in the Latin sentences but no particular emphasis is provided in their English translation.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelWied

It is really wrong, because "I" and "me" are both pronouns describing the same person, just in different cases (one nom, one acc). Having both is then repetitive and doesn't make sense. Now whether you could say, "Ego male habeo," I'm not sure or not. Normally you would use the nomative case (ego) in that context, but it has you do the accusative case, and I'm not sure if there's a reason for that.

September 14, 2019, 2:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunalui

"Ego male habeo" is completely wrong and makes no sense at all. This is a reflexive construction and the verb is "se habere", so the reflexive pronoun (the accusative) cannot be omitted. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflexive_verb Adding "ego" to "me male habeo" is possibly redundant but certainly not wrong (when added it emphasizes the subject, meaning something like "you may be fine, but I am sick"). Also, "ego" can be omitted because it is implicit in "habeo" not because "me" and "ego" refer to the same person. Think of the English "I wash" and "I wash myself": they simply do not mean the same thing.

September 14, 2019, 3:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Okay. Can you say: Me habeo male?

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

Yes.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alecbot3000

Don't understand why it marked me wrong for "Habeo me male" for "me male habeo". Does the word order really matter in this case? I have seen somewhere that word order can be used for emphasis in Latin. Am I missing something in this example?

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

What you wrote was fine. Next time, flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Male me habeo or Me male habeo?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

Either. Also "Me habeo male."

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Austin892130

Why is the 'me' necessary? I was taught that personal articles arent needed when using the first person singular verb, because it's implied

September 13, 2019, 11:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

The subject pronoun is not needed. "Me" is the reflexive pronoun, not the subject. The subject pronoun would be "ego".

September 13, 2019, 11:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

Also pronouns, not articles, and not just in first person singular.

September 13, 2019, 11:54 PM
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