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"Corinna non est puella, sed femina est."

Translation:Corinna is not a girl, but a woman.

August 27, 2019

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Would you be able to say, "Corinna non est puella, sed femina"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

Yes that works too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natasha609751

You can also write "Corinna non puella, sed femina est", which also sounds more natural to me than the original sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CounterpartJack

Indeed. Another more natural parsing would be: "Corinna puella non est, sed femina."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucretius6

You could even just write "corinna non puella sed femina"..the verb "sum" was often omitted, classically


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trezapoioi1

It would sound more natural, actually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polysermo

Yo, "sed" is the same in Esperanto! That makes things easy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkWootton

Saluton al vi, samideano!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polysermo

Ho, ankau saluton al vi!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkWootton

Ĉi tiu kurso estas bona montraĵo de ĝuste tiom, kiom Latino Esperanton influis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"sed" is the same in Esperanto!

In fact, a number of words in Esperanto come (nearly) straight from Latin!

kvankam < quamquam; tamen < tamen; apud < apud; sub < sub are some other examples.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Vera, ne vere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

The English suggested translation is awkward. English do not really have elliptical subjects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trezapoioi1

That second "est" also looks awkward in the original sentence, thb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luizdemello

I think you got things mixed. Elliptical subjects are the ones with omitted or implied parts, and English has plenty of those. For example "John watches more tv than I (watch [tv])" or "Mark plays some instrument, I just don't know which (instrument he plays)" - the versions without the stuff in parenthesis and brackets are elliptical clauses, and not the ones that spell it all out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klanten

Shouldn't that also be correct: Corinna is not a girl but a woman?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethB165971

'Corinna is not a girl, but a woman' was not accepted, but 'Corinna is not a girl, but is a woman' sounds rather stilted to a native English speaker. I would only add the second 'is' for extra emphasis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. It's also accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRyan825350

When should you put "est" at the end of a statement and when is it acceptable to put it within the statement?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

If you have a negating word, like nōn, then it follows the negating word. Otherwise, it doesn't matter. You can order sentences however you like to stylistically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRyan825350

Thank you very much! And here I thought English is weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelErnold

hey hey hey... English will ALWAYS be weird


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Corinna nōn est puella, sed fēmina est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trezapoioi1

They could probably have solved that phonemic problem just by going with Ecclesiastic. This attempt at Classical makes it sound like a constructed language, especially as the speakers are native to a language that has no phonemic connection to Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonathan480546

Corinna isn't a girl, rather she is a woman should be an accepted translation.

Whereas here, rather is a subordinating conjunction indicating contradiction. It should be encompassed by the meaning of 'sed'

In fact, this is a more specific translation, as in Latin i believe it is only used as a conjunction, and the english word but can be used as an adverb or preposition with different meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polysermo

I agree, but it would need a comma after "rather" as well as before it if I'm not mistaken. Not that Duo actually reads punctuation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suziegler

For me, it would be : Corinna is not a girl, but she is a woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ichbineinpreusse

Does "sed" equate only to "sondern" in German, or can it also be used the same as "aber"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Does "sed" equate only to "sondern" in German, or can it also be used the same as "aber"?

Both.

Marcus dormit sed Livia studet. "Marcus schläft aber Livia studiert."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leo967241

But you just said she was a girl!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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These are just sentences to teach vocabulary and grammar. They are not intended to be autobiographical or to form a coherent narrative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loganwater11

the grammar is a little off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The English or the Latin? And in what way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celestiashades

it says "Corinna non est puella, sed femina est." why they put the first "est" behind "puella" and the second is in front "femina"? are we can't make it "Corinna non est puella, sed est femina."? and also why? bcs rn i'm really confused. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaraTamar1

GUYS DOULINGO HAVE VIRUS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :□


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benjamin676981

Corīnna non ēst puēlla, sed femina ēst.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soulnaakseo

Im new to Latin (apparently,) but arent there any definite/indefinite article distinction in Latin?? Just asking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonathan480546

There are not either. In certain (uncommon)circumstances other determiners can be used in place of the definite article in translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ntyler01mi

There was only one "is" when I did this. Literally, shouldn't it be "Corinna isn't a girl, but she is a woman?"

The expected answer is more elegant, and possibly even more natural. However, when I'm a beginner translating something for the first time, I'm not really trying to figure out how I would best say this in English. I'm trying to understand what is literally being constructed in the Latin and find the matching English words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

"Corinna non est puella, sed femina est."

I'm trying to understand what is literally being constructed in the Latin.
"Corinna isn't a girls, she is a woman."

There is no "she" in the Latin sentense, but there is "sed" ("but").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ntyler01mi

The point is that there are two verbs (est/is) in the Latin statement, but only one "is" was provided to construct an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

It seems to me that a couple of months ago it was "Corinna is not a girl, but is a woman". But I am not a native English speaker, I don't care about that :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ichbineinpreusse

The above reply is correct. "but a woman" for the second part is also accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xenozone

I know it's not 'correct' to say "Corinna is not a girl, she's a woman", but is it 'wrong'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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There is absolutely nothing "incorrect" about "Corinna is not a girl, she's a woman". It might not be the strictest translation (because part of this lesson is teaching the word "sed"=="but"), and the course contributors might not have included it in the answer database, but there is nothing wrong with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanRoe3

Can you omit the second 'est'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I believe so, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex197908

my mistake was typing korina instead of corinna, i feel ripped off :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The correction algorithm allows for up to one wrong letter per word to slide by as a typo, and you had two wrong letters. We learn from our mistakes, so take this as a lesson and do better next time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pim124359

lassie does also mean GIRL, I typed... Corinna is a lassie, and it was considered incorrect!!!! WHY????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MScottNataleonFB

duolingo won't usually use a synonym from 1830's wild-west Texas or 1750's Ireland to teach...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pim124359

I answered using "lassie" instead of using "girl" and my answer was taken as incorrect, WHY??? Lass or lassie are noun also used to describe a young female!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseHirsbrunner

How would you say "Corinna is not a girl, but the woman is"? (I know it makes no sense)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneTanne

You might say: Non Corinna sed femina est puella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiotrJot12

My guess is, that in order to say just that you need to be more specific (although you are right, it does not make sense): Corinna non est puella, sed femina est puella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The sentence is confusing, because of the lack of meaning (if the woman is a girl, it's weird)

Could you replace your sentence by
"Corinna is not a student, but the woman is"? Or something like that. Your sentence is a bit headache-inductor.

Corinna non est discipula, sed femina.
Corinna non est discipula, sed femina est.
Non Corinna, sed femina discipula est.

Are there other ways to say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Scipsit Perce Neige:

1) Corinna non est discipula, sed femina. 2) Corinna non est discipula, sed femina est. 3) Non Corinna, sed femina discipula est.

-- To me, number 1 means "Corinna is not a student but a woman" (and, even though Latin word-order is famously "free", I'd be more comfortable with "Corinna non discipula sed femina est").

-- Number 3 I'd read as meaning "The woman, not Corinna, is a student".

-- While number 2 (with its two "est"s) just doesn't feel right somehow.

But then, quid enim scio? I'm just returning to Latin after having "dropped" it at school 59 years ago -- so you'd be perfectly justified in taking my observations cum grano salis. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I should have added to my last comment the observation that there were no commas (or very much else at all in the way of punctuation) in Classical Latin, which does add to the inauthentic feel of some of the sentences Duolingo has invented for its lessons. It's all the more reason why we should be introduced as quickly as possible to the other, textual and sentence-construction methods by which Latin made explicit the subtleties of interpretation which modern European languages convey by means of punctuation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenHayo

Is this order correct? Corina non est puella, sed Marcus vir est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike108631

The sentence ended: sed femina est. Shouldn't it have read: Corinna is not a girl but is a woman. (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It's called ellipsis. It's very common to omit the repeated element in the second clause when it's parallel construction with the first clause. But beyond that, different languages have different grammar structures and different ways of saying things. The English and the Latin don't need to be in perfect lockstep with each other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Would it be correct in English to say:
"Corinna is not a girl, but it's a woman"

Just asking to strengthen my English skills.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polysermo

Except for "it's", that is correct. Rather than "it's", "she's" should be used. "Corinna is not a girl, but she's a woman." Good job!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrM356254

how may i translate this is there a rule how to put words in order or i tranclate word to word please tell somebuddy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

Hello,

Word order in Latin is relatively fluid, so translating word for word can end up in a weird or even incorrect translation. So your best bet is to adopt the phrasing that is most natural to the language you are translating in (while if possible keeping the emphasis effects the variations from canonical order in Latin sometimes convey).

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