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  5. "Illi sunt benigni."

"Illi sunt benigni."

Translation:They are kind.

August 27, 2019

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaptianKaos8

The translation "They are nice" is not accepted 27 Aug 2019. May I ask why?

Anyway; can't blame 'em; the course just came out today!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's accepted now. For the "why" the answer is: it takes times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LacieLooWho

Does this mean "they [referring to males] are kind"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Illi has the same form for the 3 genders when it's dative, but here, it's nominative (=subject), so it's a male "they".

Male they: illi, (ils in French)
Female they: illae, (ellas in Spanish)
Neutral they: illa.

(note: it's only the plural "they", not the singular they referring in English to an unknown gender, as it's non existent in Latin).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

They could be men, or men and women: mixed gender groups are described using masculine adjectives and pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I know that illi = they or those.

Could I say "Those ones are kind", here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ged92781

Why is it illi and not ii?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inconcinna

Illi is not wrong, but ii should also be counted as correct (as should ei, another form for ii).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's very interesting. I've found ii = ei,
but not illi = ii or illi = ei.
Do you have a source?

ei = ii = eeis (archaic)
Found in the second table here:
http://www.dicolatin.com/XY/LAK/0/EI/index.htm

Illi. Plural nominative of "ille" (ille is masculin).
Ille: that, he.
Illi: masculine (plural): those, they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devashreeraje

what's the difference between illas, illis and illos? also, what case are they in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter
  • illos : accusative masculine plural
  • illas : accusative feminine plural
  • illis : dative/ablative masculine/feminine/neuter plural

Here the complete declension:
https://www.latin-is-simple.com/en/vocabulary/dempron/2/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devashreeraje

thank you so much! this helped a lot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c0cYAB2S

Why some comments are closed and not this one? Strange censorship


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

I heard some have even been burned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

I really hope you meant banned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BedrichCiz

you should use iī (eī, ī)/ eae / ea only in this case of pronomina demonstrativa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rowanpspsps

Wouldn't "benign" also be a correct alternative to the word "kind"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NigelCarte3

The earlier section had "illi benigni sunt". Are both correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter

"These are kind." should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago-san

Why isn't it Illi benigni sunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter

This would be also correct. The position of the verb isn't fix.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Den_hvalrossen

Not sure if this is the best place to ask this, but what's the difference between illa, ille, ea, and is? Likewise, what's the difference between illi, illos, ii, and eae? Just a bit confused on all the pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter

It is quite difficult for me to explain it in English (which is not my mothertongue), but I will try.

There are three demonstrative pronouns in Latin:

  • hic, haec, hoc (plural: hi, hae, haec) : this (here) => someboby/something near
  • iste, ista, istud (plural: isti, istae, ista) : that (there) => someboby/something a bit further
  • ille, illa, illud (plural: illi, illae, illa) : that (over there) => someboby/something far away

However, the pronoun "is, ea, id (plural: ei/ii, eae, ea)", which is most of the time translated with a personal pronoun (he, she, it), can also be translated with a demonstrative pronoun.

Example:
Duos oratores adsunt. Eos audio. Hic malus est, ille optimus est.
There are two orators. I hear them (or eventually: these ones). This one is bad, that one is very good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefan866267

Good should be accepted as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter

This would be "boni".

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