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"The sick woman goes to the doctor."

Translation:Femina aegra ad medicum it.

August 27, 2019

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejmears

"Femina" should not be required as the gender is clear from "aegra"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardTamb1

I think it's a little early to be teaching substantive adjectives...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

In the same exercise we have "Medicus aegrum sanat."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, but in this case how to know if it's a woman or a girl?

I though it was only possible for masculine?

I would need clarifications.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

I would agree with this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svaca19

I don't think it is that weird. "They heal the sick. I hate the poor." are understandable sentences in English. Also many learners speak English as a second language and substantive adjectives are pretty commom in other languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clebus_Maximus

mulier should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardTamb1

Not in the list of options, though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clebus_Maximus

fair point. it certainly is an option without a word bank and with a keyboard, though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please report "mulier", it was accepted in other sentences as a synonym for femina.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrieKoen

When do we use "a" and when "ad" as a preposition?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllieSwell

don't take my word for it because in truth i'm at sea with all this too, but as I understand it: the two prepositions are ad, which is 'to' and ab, which is 'from'.

however 'ab' behaves like the english word 'an' and loses the b when the following word has a consonant.

So you get 'ab urbe', 'from the city', but 'a foro', from the market. the preposition is the same in both sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

"Aegri" can be used for "sick men". Can "aeger" be used for "sick man" (instead of vir aeger") & "aegra" for "sick woman" (instead of "femina aegra")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Yes. Using an adjective without a noun like that is called a “substantive adjective”.

English does this too, yet not as often. An example would be: “the rich are fighting the poor.“. The word “people” is the implied modified noun for both English adjectives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

Thanks, good to hear that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jurena12

Does "medicam" work in place of "medicum" ? It was not accepted for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

While a female doctor would certainly be less common, nothing in the English sentence says the sex of the doctor, so yes, it should be ok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jurena12

Thank You @magister_Smith!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wanote26

word order irrelevant, surely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

except for "ad medicum," which should be kept in that order, and together. All other words may change position.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllieSwell

is it possible to leave the preposition out altogether? does 'medicum it' or 'medico venit' speak for itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

No, you should include it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardTamb1

But useful for beginners!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulKohler1

Maybe my work order wasn't ideal, but Latin is fully inflected, and so word order shouldn't matter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Inflection does make the word order looser, but there are guidelines or rules that were nearly always followed.

For instance prepositions should precede their objects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brooke.Garrett

"It" is only one form of "she goes," it could also be "venit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

“Venire” is more “to come” or “to arrive.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theloniouss

Aeger, aegro,aegra...I'm really confused...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

The ending on the adjective depends on: 1) which declension it belongs to, and 2) the gender, number and case of the noun it modifies/describes. If you google "Latin declension tables", you should be able to find a handy reference to check as you study :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yvonne550472

What is the relevence of this series of exercises?

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