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  5. "The sister is in the city, b…

"The sister is in the city, but the brother is at home."

Translation:Soror in urbe est, sed frater domi est.

August 27, 2019

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejmears

Repeating the verb twice should not be required by this exercise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

It is possible to only have the last verb and leave off the first one. You can go ahead and report that as correct if it isn't accepted.

"Soror in urbe, sed frater domi, est."

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

They should all be accepted now, but unfortunately it takes some time for the changes we make in the Incubator to be active for users (sometimes as long as two weeks).

Still, please report if it's not accepted, it's still possible something got missed!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malleto

Thanks for all your hard work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

Sorry to be commenting on this here, but the option was not available in the right place. I notice that "city" is given as "urbe" and I can see why that makes the early exercises easier for beginners; but is the correct nominative not "urbs"? Perhaps one could give "urbe" but with the English as "in the city"? If this has already been discussed somewhere, never mind:) So very glad you are doing a Latin course!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

OK, that's already been changed. :) Unfortunately though it takes some time for the changes we make in the Incubator to go live for users.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

The correct nominative is "urbs", yes. Where have you seen "urbe" given for "city" rather than "in the city", was it in an image exercise?


[deactivated user]

    I have been using urbe the entire time... From the first exercise, I think.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

    Yes, it was--very early in the first exercise.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

    Latin typically doesn't like such repetition. It likes to be as economical as possible, and so most Classical authors would instead say something like:

    Soror in urbe, frater domi est.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malleto

    Im noticing latin loves less is more and it gives me such a wonderful asl vibe, i love it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlirezaRah733067

    Hi . Do you recomend any book . You know ! in latin


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetronaBen

    Well you are right but at the same time no you aren't


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claton9

    It wouldn't be a proper sentence then.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllenBouch

    "The sister is in the city, but the brothe at home" wouldn't be correct in English, so I'm not surprised that it's not correct in Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenMiller244699

    There needs to be more consideration for Latin's flexibility in word ordee. domi est and est domi are equivalent, even if Romans put the verb at the end more often


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

    They should all be accepted now, but unfortunately it takes some time for the changes we make in the Incubator to be active for users (sometimes as long as two weeks).

    Still, please report (with the button in the lesson, not in the discussion) if it's not accepted, it's still possible something got missed!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charly396845

    Why IN urbe but Domi without IN


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

    "Domus" is one of the handful of common nouns that uses Locative, so no preposition. "Urbs" is not, so it uses the preposition and Ablative.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WeStWo0D

    Why can't you say "Soror est in urbe"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

    You can, and it should be accepted now, but unfortunately it takes some time for the changes we make in the Incubator to be active for users (sometimes as long as two weeks).

    Still, please report (with the button in the lesson, not in the discussion) if it's not accepted, it's still possible something got missed!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

    You should be able to, though that wouldn't generally be idiomatic Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    Why not? The verb "to be" is very commonly found located in the middle of the sentence, (or at the beginning) as opposed with other kinds of verbs. So what is uncommon in "Soror est in urbe"?

    "To be" is not an usual verb, it's a copula, and many Latin grammars explain that "subject-copula-predicate" as an usual word order.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metlieb

    Should be perfectly fine, considering the flexible sentence structure and word order of Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lou458078

    Can someone give me some guidance on when to use URBS, URBE and URBES?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattSchoon

    "Urbs" is the nominative case and "urbe" is the ablative case. Wiktionary has plenty of handy declension charts.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryHensl1

    I am typing exactly what it says, and its saying Im wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lekto3

    Why "in urbe", but not " in domi"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

    Because domus is such an old word that it takes the locative case (the case for where you are). Newer words needed to use in + ablative to create an ablative of place (so an ablative of location).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AguacateDe1

    Could "soror in urbe sunt sed frater domi est" work?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

    No, “sunt” is plural and “soror” is singular.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllenBouch

    You need a microphone that you didnt get at the dollar store. The audio is actually painful.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine969755

    I get confused sometimes as to when to put in the preposition and when to leave it out. I understood the use of ablative shows the meaning without the preposition. In the above sentence - the first phrase has "in" but the second one leaves it out.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

    domus is a noun that can use the locative case (which is domi). Nouns that cannot use the locative will instead often use in with the ablative.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetronaBen

    Well I've uplosded this app bunches of times and I still don't get the hang of languages who :'(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dutoan

    Why do we need plus est in the statement.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanychAZ

    I believe germana should also be accepted for sister. It's translated as "full sister" while soror is also a "half-sister" and even a "mistress"...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertCox523416

    I'm confused as to why est comes after the rest of the phrase when it's describing that they are "in the city". Wouldn't is come before in urbe?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shann350341

    A full stop should not warrent a fail.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aries_Jernik

    Can Someone Explain The Different Pronunciations Of Feminine & Masculine Words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CpUvT

    So you need english punctuation in the hard responses? Doesn't seem fair.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodolfoKon

    Soror in urbe...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandroriano3

    Can we also say: "Soror in urbe est, sed frater IN domi est"? If not, why is "in urbe" accepted and "in domi" is not? Thanks


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

    "Domus" is one of the handful of common nouns that uses Locative, so no preposition. "Urbs" is not, so it uses the preposition and Ablative.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

    Consider the English, 'I'm coming from home' (PREP + NOUN) and 'I'm going home' (ADVERB). The Locative in 'domi' is used like an adverb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandroriano3

    Thank you very much!


    [deactivated user]

      I understand why we use "est" for the sister, but why don't we use "es" for the brother?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

      "Est" is for the 3rd person singular, sister, female, or brother, male.
      If you studied French, as I see, "est" in Latin, is exactly "est" in French, and "es"in French is exactly "es".

      "Es" is for "tu", the 2nd person singular (singular you).

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