"Novum Eboracum in California non est."

Translation:New York is not in California.

August 27, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ukaunz

I love the fact that such a contemporary sentence can be translated into such an ancient language :-)

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Calida Fornax • Hot Furnace • Latin

• khalipha • [ خلیف ] • steward [ خلیفه ] • khaliphia • female caliph • steward • Land of the Califa

de cil de Califerne • The Song of Roland, 11th century French poem on 15 August, 778 Charlemagne defeat to Basque army in the Battle of Roncevaux Pass

California Etymology

September 15, 2019, 4:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hectorlqr

How come York turns into Eboracum? What's the etymology?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ukaunz

Eboracum was a Roman city where present day York is situated in Britain. I'm not sure if "York" evolved from the roman name, but I can see where Duolingo got "Novum Eboracum" = New York, even if it is only a linguistic joke.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

I can see where Duolingo got "Novum Eboracum" = New York, even if it is only a linguistic joke

In fact, the Seal of NYC has 'Novi Eboraci' on it, and has done since the 17th century. DL didn't make this term up!
Here is the original seal of the Province of New York, created in 1669 (or 1664—I find conflicting references), with 'Sigill Provine Novi Eborac[i]':

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Facundo727747

wow nice coment!

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

'Eboracum' is the Latinised version of the original, Brittonic name of the settlement meaning 'of the yews'. This became 'Eoforwic' in Old English, which the Norse (who occupied York for a considerable period) turned into 'Jórvík', which Middle English subsequently turned into 'York'.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Thank you! I know Eboracum and Jórvík, but not how they are related. Diolch yn fawr

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adlertopf

Ydych chi'n siarad Cymraeg?

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ice-Kagen

The pronunciation sounds more English than Latin...

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-A

I was having the same thought. The speaker has an obvious English accent.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mataytay69

Anyone have audio of what latin sounds like?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yf7rU0pd

No, but there are books about it from witnesses of the period and other derivable clues that suggest how it may have sounded. The Channel "Alliterative/The Endless Knot" on YouTube produced a good summary of that topic, if you're interested.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yf7rU0pd

Correction: it was NativLang! However, Alliterative is also quite a good channel in terms of languages. Here's the video I was referring to: https://youtu.be/_enn7NIo-S0

September 16, 2019, 8:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraSeedling

Maybe. We can't really check what it sounded like back in the day...

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-A

We may not know exactly what Latin sounded like, but it was almost certainly not like this. The speaker has an obvious English accent. For example, listen to the way she pronounces the E in Eboracum. It should be a monophthong, but she pronounces it like a diphthong. This is a common mistake English speakers make when speaking other languages, and it's highly unlikely that that is how the Romans pronounced it.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentM929983

Can someone explain why the declensions arent switched? Its been a long time since i saw this stuff in highschool.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

in when describing a location uses the ablative case. The ablative case of nouns ending in -a ends in , and Duolingo does not show vowel length in writing.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBeatha

Is California being declined as a Latin word though? It doesn't sound to me like she's saying Californiā with the expected ablative ending.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yf7rU0pd

Ugh.. the pronunciation again.. "Eboracum" is pronounced almost as if it was "Ebra-cum" - ignoring the "o" and on top of that stressing the last syllable, which shouldn't be. "California" straight up uses an English pronunciation.. :/

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardbeeson

you can just imagine Brutus replying - "well hey, i didn't know that!!"

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/compsognathus

Ah thanks for letting me know! I was a bit unsure about where I was :)

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The9

I'm very pleased to see the Duolingo course includes reconstructed Latin, so we can learn it as a living language!

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharliePoe1

Whu translate city nam???????? :(((

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Charlie, this is actually a very good question, but at the same time, I bet you do it all the time, too. Do you say Roma, Köln, Lisboa, Baile Atha Cliath, Hēung Góng?

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

I get why New York is Novum Eboracum, but what's with California? I mean, it does sound Latin.

September 8, 2019
Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.