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"Femina scribit, sed vir non scribit."

Translation:The woman writes, but the man does not write.

August 27, 2019

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

Should be ['skriː.bit]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Right. I think it should be [feːmɪna skriːbɪt | sɛd wɪr nõː skriːbɪt].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

I wonder how far they'll go with the nasalization of vowels in relation to -m and -n. I've been in classes of spoken Latin and the professors--professors committed to spoken Latin--have just disregarded it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tenienteramires

i would say in classical Latin it should be: [fɛːmina skɾiːbit | sɛd wir nɔ̃ː skɾiːbit].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

If we follow the Calabrese system, you're right, and I do subscribe to it now — but I'd still pronounce the nasalised (+nasal +long) vowels as raised, like ScorpioMartianus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKatoGranda

Scorpio Martianus, eh ;)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

I think you're right -- given that the /s/ follows /no:n/, it may follow the phonotactic of nasalising the vowel preceding a fricative and not realising itself as another phone


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnesophieRose

What's with the weird pronunciation of "vir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliteGameKnight

It's classic pronuciation. the latin 'v' sounds like the english 'w". It goes over the pronunciation a little bit in the course notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katja-z

@AgnesophieRose

I know. It makes me cringe. Especially if it has an American accent added to it.

It's not the pronunciation I learned so long ago. (I have forgotten pretty much all my Latin but the pronunciation stuck.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Yeah, the actual problem is not the v but the i which can be explained with the accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

and a british voice wouldn't be weird on a Mediterranean language?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DecarbonatedOdes

For the emphasis, I'm not sure. The pronunciation of "v" in Latin is an English "w". So vir becomes wir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Prinzherbert

It's so nice to do this knowing portuguese and english. You can understand most words based on the ones you already know from latin-based languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fridelain

Is the second 'scribit' necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonlang_

I don't know if 'non' is allowed to stand by itself in Latin. Because Latin verbs encode person as well as the action and tense, it may be required where it wouldn't be in English (The woman is writing but the man is not).

Someone who's more well versed in Latin will have to confirm, but I'd go with the pattern being taught for now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah357620

Accepted as of 2/8/20


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johan923282

no, just there to present more possible incorrect answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

Some of this vocabulary was imported directly into Esperanto, like 'sed' which is unchanged (if you say 'sed' in Spanish, it means 'thirst'). 'Vir' is another word, but an '-o' was added: 'viro'. If you want to say 'woman', just add '-ino'. Esperanto doesn't have gender, so 'la' is used for 'the' throughout. Here's the sentence in Esperanto: "La virino skribas, sed la viro ne skribas."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Etienne_Reny

Why is "woman writes, but man does not write" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

I guess in English that sounds like a general statement? Or slightly ungrammatical? English generally wants articles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonlang_

Exactly. When you translate from one language to another you don't translate each word as you see it; you translate the meaning.

Mae'r ddynes yn sgwennu ond dydy'r dyn ddim yn sgwennu would be the Welsh translation, but word-for-word it's "is the woman -ing write but is not the man not -ing write" which is obviously not an acceptable English translation. The translation is "The woman is writing but the man is not writing".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomanMalla

Is the second scribit simply redundant leaving it to be implied?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianM233375

I'm Italian and I studied Latin for two years at school, and I can tell you that this pronunciation is completely wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

Per Calabrese system: [ˈfɛː.mi.na] would be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Val724045

The male voice has a horrible American accent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hPALLY

This guy has the most cringy accent in the world, wish I could just remove him


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel835570

The pronunciation sounds very American


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le_Seigneur

pronounciation is all wrong... Is there a way I can submit something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Slo

Funny how the audio pronounces a diphtong in "feimina"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-stray-dog

Shouldn't 'The woman is writing, but the man is not (writing)' also be accepted? Building onto a question that has appeared before, where 'Puella dormit' was 'The girl is sleeping'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donald798622

"The woman writes but not the man." This should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea181525

Ho solo dimenticato il The in cima alla frase. Fate la versione in latino anche per italiani


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amina434907

Latin is not spoken in any country so how do you know the accent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

Linguistics is fascinating, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bako229678

European common language, Catholic church, Vatican city, it might not be the spot on accent of Julius Caesar, but the language was very much used continuously in Europe even after fall of the western Rome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alon971989

So how do I say "A woman writes", rather than "The woman writes"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talos_the_Cat

The same way. If you want to really say "one woman" then you'd say "ūna fēmina" (with ū representing /u:/ and ē representing /ε:/)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CreeperBoy101

seriously, i guessed bec the word bank gives you words and you can guess from them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronJacks38141

It gave me the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PositiveNu

Tf is the man doin then


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harleypearce

Could you drop the last scribit and just have it "sed vir non"? Or is that grammatically incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulus217503

Femina sounds like Semina (a clear 'S' sound)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanshaj3

Not getting accepted 2/2/2021


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.rAyk8J

It so good but you should include english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yevaka-18yo

"Feminae scribunt, sed viri diurnalis non scribit" will be an example when you could interpret the sentences as being spoken in indefinite article, but in all ways it could be also be interpreted as a definite article. The problem with Duolingo is you don't get natural conversation in form of stories in Latin, but luckily you can get help in many free websites that teach the latin language with a quick google search or just looking at the latin forum in Duo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bako229678

Why are articles so important, that answers are marked false when translating from languages that do not have them to English? It is not an english course


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

If you want to learn how to translate from one language to another, you have to respect the grammar of both languages.

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