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  5. "Marce, ubi dormiunt filiae t…

"Marce, ubi dormiunt filiae tuae?"

Translation:Marcus, where do your daughters sleep?

August 27, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SenorDustin

Remember here that Marce is the vocative form of Marcus because he is being directly addressed. Also, why does someone need to know where Marcus' daughters are sleeping?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobbySweetkitty

Well, if someone came around asking in latin where my daughters are sleeping, I'll be in the know. Also, I'd be terrified, but I would understand. Now I need to learn to say, "get out."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2602

"Go away" would be "abi" or "abite", depending on how many people you're talking to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griann62

In Rome, I am sure an ite and a sword to the throat would get appropiate intent across.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuesoGr7

Vampire looking for a meal a cultist in need of some sacrifices. Nothing wierd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaiphusha

Like Call Case in old Russian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocagi99

If so, then why does the latin say Marce? In the latin, he's also directly addressing Marcus. It's misleading


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L-Rell

Every Greco-Roman myth starts this way.

Do you want minotaurs? Because that's how you get minotaurs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoralLorna

Im having a real struggle distinguishing between filii and filluae from the speaker's voice . Without knowing the context or seeing the writing I have to just take a guess on what is being said. Not very satisfactory.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2602

You'll need to flag the lesson and report a problem with the audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Th3Vip3r

This is a fun question...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queen_Riot

I Mean Its Just A Question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrismoorew

Why does the vocative form of the name get carried over into English, when it does not happen in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2602

It doesn't. Only the nominative form is the one we use in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

I don't understand you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaybury

The name is always Marcus in English, not Marce. The vocative form is only applied to the Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineM727245

The vocative form is in Lithuanian I believe. Why is the verb not at the end of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2602

Because it's a question, and questions bring the focus word toward the front.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

In Lithuanian, Latvian and the most of the Slavic languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queen_Riot

Marce, ubi dormiunt filiae tuae. Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaybury

Looks alright, why do you ask?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amifra8

If is in vocative, and clicking on thw words it says "hay Marcus"; why duolingo consider it a mistake if I write "hey Marcus" instead of "Marcus"?

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