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  5. "Cotidie matrem visitas."

"Cotidie matrem visitas."

Translation:Daily, you visit mother.

August 27, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3CelticVikings

"Daily you visit mothet" is an awkward top correct response... This should maybe be reworked...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

I mean, itis still grammatically correct, though this is less common. It's more of an accusative wording, putting emphasis on "daily," and almost feels theatrical. For instance "Daily you visit mother behind my back!"

But I was a little surprised by their sudden choice in mirroring the Latin syntax, though if it were a true mirror it would sound more like Yoda with the SOV format.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

With the comma: Daily, you visit...

There's a comma, because it's an adverbial phrase of time.

The equivalent for the emphatic "Daily, you visit your mother", would be, I think, also emphasized in "Visitas matrem Cot(t)idie", or "Matrem visitas Cottidie". Putting the emphasize on the last word here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

With or without the comma, it's still very awkward to start this kind of sentence with "daily".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's given in grammar books. I don't invent anything.

Adverbial phrases of time can be placed at the beginning of a sentence (It's not their most common place, though). Check it and give me the link if you find the opposite in a grammar book.

When it's used this way, it emphasizes the adverbial phrase. The emphasize is maybe weird or unnatural, but it's grammatical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2612

I did not say it was ungrammatical. I, a native English speaker, said it was awkward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

"Adverbial phrases of time" don't all work the same way. Adverbs of definite frequency are less flexible than adverbs of indefinite frequency.

Adverbs of definite frequency, such as "daily", have a very strong preference for the end of a clause:

https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/adverbs-frequency.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windrammer

It corresponds to the word order to avoid confusion (if there would be any).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

It would be better to acknowledge that English and Latin have different syntax, and corresponding the word order isn't the best way to illustrate how the languages operate.

Not really a response to you, as much as it is the tree itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

If they want to synchronise with Latin word order, they should have added a comma like "Daily, you visit mother." to make it proper English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Cottidie/cotidie is really like the French "quotidien", Spanish "cotidiano", Italian "quotidiano", etc... meaning daily.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tatianandreeva

Surely, all these languages derive from Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, but etymology helps a lot to understand, and to remember.

Impossible to study Latin without studying the etymology of our modern words.

And it's fascinating to see how one word "Cot(t)idie", gave birth to such different words, in the descend languages, because of the accents, or the habits of the population in a specific area.

For instance, there's no "n" in Cottidie, so why the nasalisation in French "quotidi-en", and why the "n" in Spanish and Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarmenPiti3

All these words are derived from the adjective "quotidianus"/"cotidianus".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katzenperson

There is also the English word quotidian, which can mean "everyday, commonplace", or it can mean "recurring daily".

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/quotidian

Interestingly, the etymologies for the English word quotidian tend to use the "qu" spelling of the Latin root, as it is from quot ("how many" or "as many as") + die, the ablative of dies ("day"). So it is sort of curious how it ended being spelled "cotidie" in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TitiLaCarotte

This is why i wrote quotidie... and got an error


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoraplifej

It should be pronounced as "cotidie" (the correct prononciation can be found here - https://forvo.com/search/cotidie/).
"cotide'e" (the current prononciation) is incorrect, reported as usual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iMwxGcrJ

Does "cotidie" only means "daily" or can it be also mean "always", because I type in "You always visit mother" and I got marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

It means "daily". It's related to the modern word "quotidian".

"Always" is "semper".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James.Kovetch

What is it that tells me that you visit mother, not mother visits you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

The inflection (form) of the words.

You visit mother = (tu) matrem visitas. Mother visits you = mater te visitat.

Nouns inflect to show case (like subject, direct object, etc). Verbs inflect to show many things, but here to show who the subject is (I, you, they, etc)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

You visit mother.
Matrem [accusative] visitas [tu conjugation].

Mother visits you.
Mater [nominative] te [accusative] visitat [ea conjugation].

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:mater
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/pronoun:tu
https://www.latin-is-simple.com/en/vocabulary/verb/6938/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauricio69371

This is one of those awkward sample sentences. It would be better to change it for a better sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2612

There is nothing awkward about "You visit mother every day", which is one of several options it accepts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

I am puzzled by "visito". Does it have the same meaning as "viso" (viso, visere, visi, visus)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

That is strange. Googling suggests that "visere" is the better option over "visitare" even though they do appear to be synonyms.

Wiktionary reports that they do share an etymology:

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