"Livia se male habet."

Translation:Livia feels poorly.

August 27, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernesto813220

"Livia feels bad" sounds better.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Livia feels poorly is a perfectly acceptable in UK English - it means she feel unwell. Livia feels bad, by contrast, is an emotional description, e.g. she feels bad about what she did/said...it wouldn't be used to comment on her health

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scipio_V

I have to completely disagree. Poorly is an adverb, the meaning of 'Livia feels poorly' is 'Livia is bad at the act of feeling' while the intent of the sentence is to convey that her state of being/health/mood is bad. Further, I have never heard anyone use this phrase in either US or UK English. Livia feels bad/unwell/poor are all grammatically correct. The current phrase sounds poorly. It is not phrased goodly. Is my meaning clearly?

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BertMcColl

"Male" IS an adverb, the adverbial form of the adjective malus. Translating an adverb with an adverb is more accurate. Regarding English grammar, a verb, in this case "feels", is modified by and adverb not an adjective. You should really think about getting a book and learning some grammar!

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scipio_V

"Feels" is modified by an adverb. Very good, Bert. Gold star for you. The problem, as I said in my post (which you might want to re-read and try harder to comprehend) is that Livia's ability to feel is not what is in question. Livia herself, a noun, is in a negative state of being. Nouns are modified by adjectives. Congratulations on figuring on that "male" is an adverb in Latin. I now encourage you to ask yourself if English grammar and Latin grammar are the same. The English sentence lacks the explicit reflexivity of the Latin. "You understood me poor." Wrong. It's "you understood me poorly", because your understanding of my comment was the problem, not you. On the other hand, "Bert seems pompously." Wrong. Bert himself, a noun, is the possessor of the bad attitude, not the innocent verb "seems". "Bert seems pompous." Now that sounds much more nicely... Ahem... NICE to me.

September 17, 2019, 6:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windrammer

Yes, but in order to learn the nuances of a language we have to sometimes let the funky sounding translations slide. Generally you have to balance literacy and contextuality with eachother in order to get the best grasp of a language.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

That depends on your dialect.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CameronCoo286637

In standard contemporary English, "bad" is the best option

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Līvia sē male habet.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leandro_lhi

Are "se male havet" and "male se habet" the same?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milakitten

Havet wouldn't be correct, but you should be able to switch the words in this case. I believe?

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna_Conisbee

would Livia male habet work? Why / Why not?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnulusLanguage

It wouldn't - the reflexive pronoun 'se' is necessary. (like in French e.g. se lever)

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clbutler3

Would you mind explaining why the reflexive pronoun is necessary here? I don't want to miss any nuances.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/louis.vang

Because a reflexive verb has always a reflexive pronoun. You could translate it literally: ' she feels (herself) bad.'

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Same than in French "se sentir" (feel). It's an expression, if you just says "sentir", it means that you feel something exterior to yourself (smell, cold, etc..) . Se sentir means that you feel inside yourself (your health or emotional state).

Se in French = oneself. Referring to an action made on ourselves. Se lever (wake up I "pull" myself out of the bed), se laver (wash, but "oneself"), se suicider (kill oneself), se colorer (color oneself) etc... can be used limitless when the meaning allows it.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ace603207

What's the function of "se"?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2039

It is the reflexive 3rd person singular pronoun.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Greetings/tips-and-notes

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhassanElDebek

Is se like the Spanish se (haberse) or a pronoun on its own?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThemistoclesL

It is the accusative form of the personal pronoun. It can be used in various ways. In this case it affects the meaning just as se in haberse, but in Latin it is never considered to be a part of the actual verb. It's more of an extra that means the action is directed to the subject.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's more like in French, because Spanish concatenate the verb and the reflexive particle.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duodpn1

"Livia does poorly" is at least as good in my dialect, I think, (to signal that she feels unwell or feels bad) though "poorly" for how someone feels isn't great with either verb. A translation that isn't so dialect specific might be better.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BertMcColl

I have found several errors today. The text presented was "Livia he male has" NOT "Livia se male habet".

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2039

Did you flag it and report it?

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eskarin1

I can't decide if I hate the man's or the woman's voice more...

September 17, 2019, 5:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scipio_V

To be fair, I appreciate that they took the trouble of manually recording classical Latin pronunciation instead of leaving us to guess or a computer to confuse everyone. But point taken.

September 17, 2019, 6:04 PM
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