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"Minime, in Italia non habito."

Translation:No, I do not live in Italy.

August 28, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maple.Staple

I was always told that there was no word for 'yes' and 'no' in latin; Where do tgese words come from, and do they have an alternative meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yannic862815

It's more of a "not at all" than a simple "no" I read in another of these discussions. Sadly that's all the information I have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalloutNv1Slife

Same question here!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JHAWB

Could we also say " Minime, ego non in Italia habito?" In which case we use "ego" or when do we omit it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

We have to omit it 99% of the time, like in Spanish, to sound natural, and when the "ego" is here, it plays rather an emphasis role.

To learn Latin, they let us use the personal pronouns, as it's not grammatically wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael723982

Habit, habito, habitant, habitas and habitat are beating me up. What is the difference between them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG
English Latin English Latin
I live habito We live habitamus
You (singular) live habitas You (plural) live habitatis
He/she/it lives habitat They live habitant

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/froymario

In Latin as in romance languages verbs are conjugated upon the noun, Habito is for I, Ego habito (I live, yo vivo); Habitas for you singular (Tú vives), is or ea Habitat (he/she lives; él vive, ella vive). Spanish examples just to compare the conjugation. Also it can be: habitar in Spanish...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alen._.1991

It's similar to French, in French every person takes different verb for example The word of eat is Manger Je(I) =mange (eat) Tu(you) =manges Il/elle(he/she) =mange Nous(we) =mangeons Vous(you) =mangez Ils/elles(they) =mangent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessy292950

Could someone give me a reference to a text where minime is used like this? I can't recall having seen it used in this way before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

If you look right at the bottom of this dictionary entry you will see numerous example quotations, mostly taken from Plautus and Terence, but also from Cicero and Sallust:

https://logeion.uchicago.edu/parvus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

In the recording of this sentence, the final a of Italia sounds short. Should it not be long since this is the ablative case? I have reported this as "The audio does not sound correct."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChevalierduTemps

Why doesn't it accept "Italiae non habito"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

Because "in Italy" is "in Italia".

Names of cities and towns and small islands are a special case and treated differently, hence "Romae" for "in Rome".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Italy is not a city.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mucccccc

Could be possible, but the locative -ae/-i replacing 'in' is mostly just used for cities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaSzost

Do not and don't is the samr thing, so please make ot count from now on


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Did you report it as "My answer should be accepted"? Commenting in the forum is unlikely to make any difference on its own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gridkeeper

The new guy's accent is terrible and completely throws me off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaryllis515864

Would it be possible to omit the double negative? (Please give an actual Latin example)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenji893449

I find it a little unfair it doesn't accept "don't"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celin789915

I was surprised with the same problem, I guess dor now we will have to avoid contractions in our answers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalloutNv1Slife

So, in negative sentences the locative case is not necessary? Or is Italia an exception?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

This is nothing to do with negative sentences. Apart from a very small number of other nouns (domus, rus and humus), use of the locative case is confined to towns and small islands. Italia is neither, so in followed by the ablative case is required.

See Places: to, from , and in for further information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arturolara9

I've notice that if you are hispanic or latino its easier to try to say the phrase in spanish but try to word like how the Spaniards would


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AfonsoWang

don't was not accepted, have to write do not...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoLipa10

Not a single Austin Powers joke?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JorgeLenF

Don't is the same thing as do not, should correct that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

Did you report it as "My answer should be accepted", then? Commenting in the forum is unlikely to make any difference on its own. There are several similar comments to yours in this discussion, but none say they've actually reported the problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkayGunel

I feel like I'm not learning anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmbonec

I write: "No, in Italy I don't live" Why is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martha81442

That is what I said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoName271604

In Italy I do not live. I was marked incorrect. Should I have been?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avery428387

I put dont instead of do not

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