"Minime, in Italia non habito."

Translation:No, I do not live in Italy.

August 28, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessy292950

Could someone give me a reference to a text where minime is used like this? I can't recall having seen it used in this way before.

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

If you look right at the bottom of this dictionary entry you will see numerous example quotations, mostly taken from Plautus and Terence, but also from Cicero and Sallust:

https://logeion.uchicago.edu/parvus

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JHAWB

Could we also say " Minime, ego non in Italia habito?" In which case we use "ego" or when do we omit it?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

We have to omit it 99% of the time, like in Spanish, to sound natural, and when the "ego" is here, it plays a emphasis role.

To learn Latin, they let us use the personal pronouns, as it's not grammatically wrong.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChevalierduTemps

Why doesn't it accept "Italiae non habito"?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

Because "in Italy" is "in Italia".

Names of cities and towns and small islands are a special case and treated differently, hence "Romae" for "in Rome".

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mucccccc

Could be possible, but the locative -ae/-i replacing 'in' is mostly just used for cities.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Italy is not a city.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnAlienHere

Should be in English.

September 1, 2019
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