"Yes, I live in Rome."

Translation:Ita, ego Romae habito.

August 28, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue-oranges

Why not 'Ita romae habito? Why is ego needed here? It has seemed in other examples that ego can be left out if the verb endings indicate who is referred to.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

"ego" is not necessary here at all.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

It let me leave it out (15 hours after your post)

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathaniel930028

I agree

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChevalierduTemps

Why doesn't it accept "In Roma habito"?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Cities/towns, domus, and a few others make use of the locative case instead of using in when referring to where something occurs.

Here, Romae is the locative case for Roma.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

Because that's never said in Latin. You don't use "in" before the name of a town, city, or small island.

An English equivalent would be saying "I'm in home" instead of "I'm home". It just ain't done that way.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

Hmmm ..... i'm at home. That should be ok?

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

The locative case of Rome is 'Romae'.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elias_m1

Why not "Ita, ego habito Romae"?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtj1125

Latin word order is flexible that would also be correct

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe601446

and also "Ita, habito Romae"

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan82

"Ita, ego habito Romae" isn't accepted. Is there a word order lesson to learn here?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLatin

In Latin the verb is last. It should be Ita, ego ROMAE HABITO not HABITO ROMAE

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Urvasi3

Not true. It's flexible. What matters is the case.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

«Sic», meaning "thus", is used in Italian varieties of spoken Latin to say "yes". Whence the word "sí/sì" etc., in modern Romance languages. It could be included as an additional option later on, maybe when the course is out of Beta.

September 5, 2019
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