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  5. "Ego lectionem lego."

"Ego lectionem lego."

Translation:I read the chapter.

August 28, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpet

In reality "capitrum" is chapter. "Lection" is a lection, a unit or a part of the study book.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I can't find any "capitrum" in any dictionary.

But I've found, for "chapter":
- "caput" (Caput X, etc..), also meaning "head", like in the English "header",
- "capitulum".

Capitulum is a little "caput". "ulum" = diminutive.
The Spanish "Capítulo" is directly from Capitulum, while the French "Chapitre" is from "Caput".

http://spinozaetnous.org/wiki/Tractatus_theologico-politicus/Caput_X

Lection. The Latin is "Lectio". It's also the same root than "lesson" (from the French leçon)

I was pretty sure than "lectio" had a link with "lecture", the substantivation of the French verb lire (to read), but "lectio" comes from "lectus" (chosen, picked, selected). It's a bit confusing.

The English "chapter" (old English chaptre) is from the French "chapitre", that comes directly from "caput", according to the etymology dictionaries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabiodaneluzzi

I agree, in Itlaian we have capitolo with the same meaning of chapter. I don' know if in republican rome lectio was more used though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxkoryukov

I misread the message :D :

latin lectio ..... from French leçon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

So with lectio, you are reading a certain selection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lukianos

I agree in principle; capitulum would be more appropriate and infers the etymology much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leo967241

Lection sounds like section


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

The most classical word for "chapter" is 'caput, capitis.' 'Lectio, lectionis' as "chapter" has no precedent--Classical, Vulgar, Medieval, Neo...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I agree! Lectio seems to be more a lesson, or a lecture (lectio divina)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradinFMajor

Absolutely right. Caput or capitulum for chapter, especially since that's the etymological root of chapter anyways; lectio is just a reading, or a lecture as you said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

"Capitulum" made its way into Old English as captel via Old French chapitre and later became chaptel or chapitel in Middle English. Modern cathedrals and monasteries have a Chapter House in which the administrative meetings of these establishments are held by the administrative body (the Cathedral or Priory "Chapter").

In mediaeval Benedictine monasteries the Chapter meeting would open with the reading of a chapter from St Benedict's rules for monastic life.

Capitulum does seem to be a better fit that lectio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

chapter = 'capitulum'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabiodaneluzzi

"Ego lectionem lego" the pronounciation here is not excellent, please consider recording once more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

I agree. In particular in the audio I heard, the e in lego is being pronounced long, where it should be short. There does seem to be a general problem with the recordings on this course that some vowels that should be long are pronounced short, and vice versa. I have reported this sentence as "The audio does not sound correct."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You need to flag it and report a problem with the audio. The course contributors do no receive notifications of comments left in these fora.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmunaVinograd

Can someone explain how it became "lectionem"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

Lectio, lectionis, f.

Lectio is a third declension noun, and 'lectio' is the nominative singular. "lection-" is the stem, and -em is the accusative singular ending for third declension nouns. Because the "chapter" is the direct object (i.e. the verb is acting on it--it is being read), you need the accusative case (here, lectionem).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabiodaneluzzi

it's Accusative for Lectio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

Becsuse it is the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betty446802

Why is "ego" or another pronoun used sometimes, when other times it is known only by the verb form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlderThanRome

The pronoun is optional so they sometimes include it, sometimes not.. When translating from English to Latin, both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/athalaberhtaz

For the record, in actual Latin texts it is virtually always left out, and when it is included it is done for purposes of emphasis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tacotank10

From what i have noticed "ego" is only used when the verb is "sum." Perhaps it is more commonly used in that structure when you are identifying one thing with another. In all other cases, it is left out and the conjugation of the verb tells you the subject of the sentence, such as Romae habito.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Cogito ergo sum."

The subject pronouns are optional regardless of the verb, because the verb conjugation will always tell you if it's 1st, 2nd, or 3rd person, singular or plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosQI_

"I read the lesson". Shouldn't this have been accepted? Why is it wrong? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Lectio" does not mean "lesson", that's why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/972rlMfC

It does not seem to mean chapter either, lecture like someone else said or reading, is what I get on searches. Volumen seems to be the best classical word I can find with a meaning of chapter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth305273

This is present tense right? The english is ambiguous. What would past/future tense be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

"The chapter" or" A" chapter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"The chapter" or" A" chapter?

Correct.

lectionem can mean "the chapter" or "a chapter". Latin did not have any articles, neither definite nor indefinite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

"Lego lectionem" is also permissible, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Possible, but not usual.

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