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  5. "Puella dormit."

"Puella dormit."

Translation:The girl is sleeping.

August 28, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zinthak

Does the context denote the article, or is 'a', 'an', and 'that' viable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Latin works like Slavic languages in this matter. There are no articles because cases are used to denote the meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karuke79

So why do they demand articles in every translation???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

In the English? Nouns in many situations require an article otherwise it doesn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

'The' and 'a' are viable here. You would have to make use of a demonstrative (illa puella) to say 'that girl'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McKosta

That would be a seperate word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanyKa882142

The sound on this is really not clear at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petewentos

So what would the phrase "sleeping girl" translate to in Latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Depends on case and number, but “I see the sleeping girl” would be “puellam dormientem video.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinBlan87522

The "i" in dormit is it pronunced "ee" as in "meet" or "i" as in "mitten"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

The “t” at the end shortens the vowel before, so like “mitten.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dattu902337

Why dont we use puella est dormit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

You should never put two finite, i.e conjugated, verbs next to each other like that.

“Est” means “he/she/it is” and “for it means “he she it sleeps” or “is sleeping” or “does sleep.”

The helping verb “is” that English uses in the present progressive is simply part of the verb in Latin.

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