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  5. "I study Latin literature."

"I study Latin literature."

Translation:Ego litteris Latinis studeo.

August 28, 2019

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenaudFR75

Why is there sometimes "litteram latinam", and "litteris latinis" and even others? Which one is the good one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That depends on what case it needs to be in. "Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to" and so it takes the dative instead of the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenaudFR75

Thank you! I'll have to read my latin book in addition to duolingo. It is too bad I think that Duoling does not show the gender (be it for latin or german, for example) of the nouns, it would allow us to learn and understand better IMHO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Are you reading the Tips and Notes before doing the quizzes? Click the little lightbulb icon for each lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenaudFR75

I see what you are talking about, alas I don't have those lessons showing for latin (at least on the mobile app), ergo the latin books I was mentioning earlier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

If you open duolingo in your browser, you should be able to access the tips. It helps somewhat. I am still having trouble with the case endings and when to use what, even with Rae's, Perce's, and Guillermo's (Guillaume's?) help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

It's "Guillermo8330", Jeanne, because I started here in Spanish. I wouldn't take offense, but it was nonetheless kind of you to ask.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

I'm using a couple of sets of Latin workbooks/grammars in addition to the Latin here. Because it's a beta version--and because they seem to want to teach classical Latin simply by immersion--I find the other works very helpful as supplements.

And, of course, there is Rae herself, who somehow answers the trickiest questions. :heart:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Aw, shucks. A lot of the credit goes to Google, really.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arial459779

I am using the android app and have not seen 'Tips' available in the Latin course. They are available in the French & Spanish courses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The devs haven't added Latin's Tips and Notes to the app yet. You'll need either an actual computer or your mobile browser to view the desktop site https://www.duolingo.com/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cory210514

Is "Ego" needed when "studeo" is the verb form? Seems there have been examples were self-referral was left out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The subject pronoun is always optional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Do you have a sense yet, Rae? Is the subject pronoun included for clarity and/or emphasis, as in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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As far as I can tell, yes, but I'm hardly an authority on the subject.

Duolingo really isn't rigorous enough to make me sure about much. Nothing against the course contributors; I know that it is a LOT of work to put a module together. It hasn't been out for long and I assume the tree will grow over time, but right now the Esperanto module is more comprehensive than the Latin. I recently finished the Latin module (my first completion!) and I can see that at the moment it's just a very casual, very basic introduction to Latin. There are a lot of noun cases it barely scratches the surface on, and we've only seen the tip of the verb iceberg. I get my best information from the actual Latin instructors who comment in these fora and work from that. I know there are some good YouTube channels, but I can only get so much from mini-lectures (no matter how well they explain a point) without a way to practice it. My husband used to have an old Latin textbook somewhere, but we're not sure if it's misplaced or long-ago sold to a second-hand book shop because we needed the money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Oh, and congrats on completing DL Latin. I agree it is very basic and look forward to the day it is expanded. But I find keeping it current very helpful as I use other sources to learn more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Thank you, Rae, that's what I figured.

I bought a bunch of different Latin texts, all available for Kindle at Amazon. The most comprehensive seems to be Wheeler's, which looks like a full year's college course. It's expensive in hardback or paperback, but under $20 on Kindle.

But after watching a YouTube video on immersive learning (a video I found thanks to some link you posted in one of these discussions, so thank you), I decided to try Familia Romana. Even the copyright page is in Latin! No English whatsoever.

I just finished Chapter 5 and so far I am really enjoying it. (The text doesn't skirt declensions, for example, it just finds ways to describe them with diagrams, pictures and Latin.) I find myself reading the chapter literature in Latin without translating it into English in my head.

Of course, the readings are elementary level and remind me of the books I read about Alice, Jerry and Jip in first grade. But even so I find it more pleasurable to read about Iulius and Aeminia and their tres liberi than banging my head against something trying to memorize declension endings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

BTW, Rae, here's something that wonders me. How did the Romans get by with the prepositions ab and ad having opposite meanings? It seems to me there must have been ample misunderstandings, given how close the sound of b and d were and are!

Or perhaps this is just proof of how much language we understand from context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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For how they got ab and ad, we would need to see the language that Latin evolved from, but we don't know that much about Latino-Faliscan or Italic, and the re-construction of Proto-Indo-European is merely our best guess based on available data and techniques.

But that issue is not unique to Latin. How often do you have to ask someone "Did you say fifty or fifteen?" "Did you say you can or you can't?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Absolutely. No one knows better than I, since I am and have always been a "fast talker" and apt to confuse listeners.

Sometimes even slowing down doesn't help. The other day I was telling someone how pleased I was to hear the word "quotidian" and finally know exactly what it meant and where it came from. "Quotidie, Latin for 'daily'", I said. I had to repeat "daily" four times and very slowly, because without any context, the listener just couldn't make sense of the sounds. (I was talking to my doctor, so not an uneducated listener.) LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raydpratt

I needed to read this thread because I was not getting any sense whatsoever why 'litteris Latinis' was used in one sentence, 'litteras Latinas' in another, and even 'linguae Latinae' in another. I still do not understand why the direct object forms are not always used, but at least I know that the problem is not my memory. I cannot find a good explanation of the dative case: the explanations are all soup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The da in dative is the same as in the Spanish dare "to give".

"Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to". You're not dedicating the literature. You're dedicating (whom?) yourself to (what?) the literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

Raydpratt, I have an entire book on the dative case (which I haven't found time to read yet). I mention this because you are not alone in finding it complicated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.aWaIfN

Can anyonw suggest me where should i learn latin because somethings atre not very clear here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ari621784

If you're looking for a text, I really like Wheelock's Latin (some other authors have written supplements to it that are also good/helpful).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillermo8330

I agree. Wheelock's is quite comprehensive and offers one a more traditional language-learning experience.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMoheel

Is "Latinis" even a thing? The dative of Latina is Latinae..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arial459779

Is "Litteris Latinis studeo." acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Please ask questions only once.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niklas760215

I (like many others here) just learned that studere takes a dative. So why isn't it "Litterae Latinae studeo."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ari621784

It's a quirk of Latin vocab. "Literature" was basically the same as "letters" to Romans. It's where the expression "a person of letters" came from and filtered into British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlie868448

Why is it not litteras latinas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kanga08

Would it be accepted if I left out the 'ego'?

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