"Quid est ei nomen?"

Translation:What is his name?

August 28, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViditChawl

Does ei mean only " his " or does it also mean " her " ?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

None of them. It means "him", "her" or "it". It is the dative singular male, female and neuter of the pronoun is/ea/id. The sentence literally means "What is the name on/for him/her/it?"

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViditChawl

Thanks for answering. So can this sentence be also translated as "What is her name ?" ?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Yes, absolutely

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlassSlippers

That's what i put and it was correct.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katycherryred

But in Latin you don't possess your name, you use the dative of advantage. There should be two translation choices- his or her- to make it idiomatic English. :)

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SikkhapatG

why "ei nomen"? why it isn't "nomen ei"

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerminasDeity

Because latin has free word order within clauses and this will be problematic as long as this course is in beta.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Both should be valid.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duluman2002

Why we use in this sentence the demonstrative pronoun : is/ea/id, at dative case, instead of possessive pronoun : suus,sua,suum , like this: ''Quid est suum nomen?''

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessioIBK

I believe this is a form of possessive dativ (assuming that this is the right name in english...). Basically, with this form you would say for instance: “To the consul is great courage” instead of “ The consul has great courage”. Translated that would be: “Magna virtus est consuli” as opposed to “Consul habet magnam virtutem”.

However, I also believe that in this case “Quid est nominem suum?” should be grammatically correct.

Edit: corrected consuli.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

I also thought of the possessive dative but I am surprised that it would be used over the genitive in this sentence. I would have used it where I want to express I have.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duluman2002

Dative of ''consul'' is ''consuli'' ''Consulis'' is genitive And the ''ad litteram'' translation of this sentence should be : '' She has the name ... '' ?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessioIBK

True about the first point! Thanks! I have corrected it in my previous post.

Concerning the second part of your post, that possessive dative is the only thing which came to my mind, so yes: the ad litteram translation would be “what is the name to him/her/it?” as far as I can see... Then again,I might be wrong...

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Quid est eī nōmen?

September 1, 2019
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