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  5. "Quid est ei nomen?"

"Quid est ei nomen?"

Translation:What is his name?

August 28, 2019

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiikPiik1

So... 'ei' = both 'his', 'her' and 'its'? That's strange, but ok.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Yep, many words in Latin have the same dative form for all three genders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Valerius

Well no. "ei" doesn't mean his/hers as a genitive. It is a dative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Except the dative of possession is frequently used in Latin, so it will often mean that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SikkhapatG

why "ei nomen"? why it isn't "nomen ei"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qwynneth662

Because latin has free word order within clauses and this will be problematic as long as this course is in beta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Both should be valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ioannes-Ma

Would "Quid ei nomen est?" be right as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Slightly unusual but yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duluman2002

Why we use in this sentence the demonstrative pronoun : is/ea/id, at dative case, instead of possessive pronoun : suus,sua,suum , like this: ''Quid est suum nomen?''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessioIBK

I believe this is a form of possessive dativ (assuming that this is the right name in english...). Basically, with this form you would say for instance: “To the consul is great courage” instead of “ The consul has great courage”. Translated that would be: “Magna virtus est consuli” as opposed to “Consul habet magnam virtutem”.

However, I also believe that in this case “Quid est nominem suum?” should be grammatically correct.

Edit: corrected consuli.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

There's no such word as "nominem"*.

"Suus" describes something belonging to the subject. In the question "quid est nomen?" the subject is "quid", so if you were to say "quid est nomen suum?" that would mean you are asking about the name of "quid". This of course would make no sense at all.

  • except for a form of the verb "nominare": "nominem" is something like "let me name".

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

Of course there is a such word as "nominem",

nōminem

first-person singular present active subjunctive of nōminō


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

I also thought of the possessive dative but I am surprised that it would be used over the genitive in this sentence. I would have used it where I want to express I have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duluman2002

Dative of ''consul'' is ''consuli'' ''Consulis'' is genitive And the ''ad litteram'' translation of this sentence should be : '' She has the name ... '' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessioIBK

True about the first point! Thanks! I have corrected it in my previous post.

Concerning the second part of your post, that possessive dative is the only thing which came to my mind, so yes: the ad litteram translation would be “what is the name to him/her/it?” as far as I can see... Then again,I might be wrong...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cameron933950

What is the difference from ei and is/ea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Is/ea (and id) are nominative male/female (and neuter), ei is dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Does ei mean only " his " or does it also mean " her " ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

None of them. It means "him", "her" or "it". It is the dative singular male, female and neuter of the pronoun is/ea/id. The sentence literally means "What is the name on/for him/her/it?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Thanks for answering. So can this sentence be also translated as "What is her name ?" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Yes, absolutely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristan887282

So in essence, you would need external context to denote which it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter978615

Have to understand what is being said, the accent is difficult to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

Now that we have two speeds of speaking buttons, why are the speeds identical?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

The two speeds only work with computer generated voices. Since these are actual people, we only get one speed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

It's strange because at first there weren't two buttons. Thank you for the information. May I ask another question people talk about losing hearts. I don't get them so I can't lose them. I use both laptop and android. Where are these hearts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Hearts are being pushed out to all users. You'll have them soon on Android. I don't think they have them for the site yet, but I'm sure we'll seem them eventually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aimee703129

So, can, "ei" mean their?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It's singular in Latin, so it could only be their in the singular sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aimee703129

Could one also say, "Quid est ea nomen?" Or is ea inappropriate here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

No, ei is used for masculine, feminine, and neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToughskinT

How would i know if it is his/her when spoken out of context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

How would i know if it is his/her when spoken out of context?

Without context, you wouldn't know whether the person being referred to was male, female, black, white, left-handed, brown-haired, or anything else. Only that it's one person, not several.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It can be him, her, or it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fimies

But we don’t use suus sua suum?

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