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"Iuvenis Novi Eboraci natus est."

Translation:The young man was born in New York.

August 28, 2019

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloBettanzzo

Est is present, not past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Natus/nata est means "was born".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

(Explanation: natus/nata est is a perfect active participle of the verb nāscor 'I am born', that's why it's was born).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In my comprehension, it's a kind of past participle (not in the grammar, but in the meaning), like "born" is a past participle too. Like "nato" in Italian, and "né" in French.

But I didn't find why it's used with the present in Italian, French, Latin, and many other languages, and with the past in English.

(My guess if that the Romance languages structures are inherited from the Latin, and the English has a very particular structure)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y_e_s_h_e_l_p

Already with the past tense?

The course is great so far, in fact - it's excellent! A bit of an odd place to start the past tense verbs, seeing as some people will still be learning the present tense.

Why not iuvenis in Novi Eboraci natus est?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

"Natus est" will be the only past tense you will see in a while, don't worry. For now, just treat "natus" like any other adjective.

Novi Eboraci is in the locative case. This is a special case which indicates a location used for cities.

Some general rules:

  • -us and -um become -i: Novum Eboracum -> Novi Eboraci / Corinthus -> Corinthi
  • -a becomes -ae: Roma -> Romae

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

The endings of the locativus merged with the endings of the genetivus...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

But why aren't we learning the present tense of this? Does "is born" not exist as a verb? It's a really odd choice for a simple present tense verb when there are so many out there. Why not get us going with "have" or "take" or "eat" or "find" or "bring" or so on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2615

Given that "est" is present tense and "natus/nata" shows gender agreement, I would say that it is present tense and is just used idiomatically when referring to the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

Sure, ok. But this comes so early in introducing Latin it's a little soon to introduce a contrary rule don't you think? Again, there must be a whole list of simpler useful verbs to learn first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

What is the etymology of Eboracum? York did not exist in the Roman civilization days so it must be a relatively new work in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

Thanks. Great links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

York did exist. It was founded by the Romans.

http://www.historyofyork.org.uk/themes/the-romans-arrive

The city was founded in about AD 71 when the 5,000 men of the Ninth Legion marched (...) and set up camp.
Eboracum, as the Romans called York, was born.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriMykolayevych

Informative link, thanks. The settlement location underwent name changes from Eboracum ending up as York.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Iuvenis Noví Eborácí nátus est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vivian2839

Why is iuvenis never capitalized?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It is capitalized in the correct answer at the top of the page because it begins the sentence. Of course the Romans only used upper case anyway I believe so I am not sure what the convention is that requires the use of lower case. I guess we just capitalize as we would in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Ok, I get it. Yes, we have modern language conventions, and it's normal, if we was to use Roman convention only, we would have no space between the words (sometimes a point), no comma, no "?", no "!", no apostrophe, no uppercases or lowercases distinctions, etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vaiterius

When should you use nata est vs natus est?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2615

It's feminine vs masculine.

Puella nata est.
Puer natus est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BananoAliBaba

Couldn't this also mean "The young man of New York was born"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

No, New York is in the locative in this sentence, so it is definitely location, not origin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelipeMont990862

so is iuvenes the singular of iuvenis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2615

Other way around.

iuvenis ==> singular nominative

iuvenes ==> plural nominative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sigzig

Why is it not possible to translate the above sentence with "is born" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

If "natus" were a normal adjective, "is [adjective]" would be the right translation, but it's a past participle (for the verb "nascor": "to be born"). Despite having "est," "natus est" (and the construction in general of "[perfect participle] est") is past tense. The present tense version would be an entirely different form "Iuvenis nascitur."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

It's a bit archaic; "puer natus est nobis" = "unto us a child (boy) is born". They may add it, if you report it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicola453060

Why not is born in New York?!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Natus est is perfect tense, so it's past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicola453060

No, sorry. "natus est" is the equivalent of "is born". Was born is "natus erat".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

That's not correct. Natus est is perfect. It's a deponent verb. The present tense "is born" would be nascitur.

Natus erat is the pluperfect form, had been born.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pim124359

Can someone please explain me... when to use Novi Eboraci... and when to use Novum Eboracum? I just cannot understand the slight tiny difference between them... thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Novum Eboracum" is the nominative/accusative form. "Novi Eboraci" is the genitive/locative form, in this case the locative meaning "in New York."

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