"Stephanus natus est in America."

Translation:Stephanus was born in America.

August 28, 2019

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerit15

It is strange for me that the language of Old Rome is so strongly connected to America in this course! Even the accents of the speakers seem to be American!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

One could suggest: Stephanus natus est in Gallia Cisalpina or Dacia

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

From time to time I work through Assimil's Latin course (audio is much better!) and they refer to things like the Euro, cars and coffee, things that didn't really exist in ancient Rome.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Because Latin is not really dead, it's still talked in Vatican city.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottMcPherson96

Yeah, I've been quite surprised at the amount of American city and state names in the course.

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's because some American people were contributors to this course. Nothing strange here.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

Roman senators from Ohio ;-)

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

Poor guy, he'll have to pay US taxes even if he's living abroad. :-(

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frejaersej

Why is it translated to "was born" and not "is born" when "est" in the present tense ?? And what would "natus erat" be translated to ?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Natus est together is a form of the perfect tense. The perfect tense refers to a past action that is completed and typically considers how it affects the present. It is a past action so we use a past tense in English when we translate, hence the "was born".

Natus erat is a pluperfect form where the action occurs in the past and typically the result affects a more recent moment in the past. Natus erat could probably be translated as "he/she/it had been born".

There is much more nuance and details to the perfect tenses but I would probably butcher the explanation.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I think you did a pretty good job right there. I have a hard time explaining the difference between past, present perfect, and imperfect in Spanish & Italian, since English uses preterite or past progressive to translate the imperfect. It's one thing to know it and another to explain it.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.
  • "He was born" -> Is est natus.
  • "He is born" -> Is nascitur.
August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelCant6120

It is the way English language says the concept. Always in the past. One isn't born. One WAS born. While, for latine, it litterally says "Stephen is born... "

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

No, Latin does not litterally say "Stephanus is born in Germany", it litterally says "Stephanus was born in Germany" or "Stephanus has been born in Germany".

I know that the construction present of verb sum + participle is deceptive, because many think that it is passive present, but in reality it is past. The passive present in Latin is synthetic; for instance, "Stephanus is born" would litterally be in Latin Stephanus nascitur.

I suspect that this will give a headache to more than one when we will study the passive voice.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeacefulPearl

I think that in English, "Stephanus is born sounds very odd;" we would not normally say something like that unless it is part of a clause such as "When Stephanus is born..." Otherwise, I can think of only one place where the usage occurs: Isaiah 9:6 "For unto us a child is born" translated from the Vulgate "Parvulus enim natus est nobis" I assume that it was translated this way to draw attention to the prophetic aspect and ongoing results , a concept not easily carried into the English, but present in the Hebrew text (Pual Perfect). I guess there is the Gregorian chant: "Puer Nobis Nascitur," "Unto Us a Boy is Born." This is interesting though; wouldn't this more accurately refer to a birth that is just now taking place?

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Yes, "is born" refers to a birth that is just taking place.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Except I think, in some expression like "a star is born".

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeacefulPearl

Yes, Perce_Neige, but this colloquialism is not a literal birth but refering to the the persons fame, which is continuing, whereas one's birth is not.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter621029

English grammar is nuts. It doesn't follow any logic like for example Slavic languages or Latin.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's wrong. Each language has its logics, if someone don't understand the logics, it doesn't make it inexistent. Sometimes it takes a lot of studies to understand the logics behind a language that is from another branch than our mother tongue.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

Now this is a clear anacronism. Nobody in America would call their son Stephanus. This demonstrates the problems arising from constantly talking about America and not the Roman empire. Personally I am here to try to become able to read and understand Latin inscriptions and litterature and not to be able to walk around i a toga, speaking latin. For that purpose the constant use of America and american locations does not exactly hit the bull's eye.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter621029

This course is a joke. They stole LLPSI content and now they cash money from ads and subscription. They should be glad Hans is dead and not suing them.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't see any problem about talking about America or about Switzerland or Italy. If we learn a language, we have to be able to talk about anything, not only about past texts. Latin is still a living languages, as new words are added to describe modern things. So, we should prevent ourselves to talk about anything in Latin?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentM929983

How is Natus qualifed? Is this actually past tense or is it more like a noun for "birth place"?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

This is a deponent verb and has an active meaning while having a passive form. Natus is the perfect active participle of nascor (nasci) and is used for the perfect system (perfect participle + esse).

Masculine forms:

natus sum -> I was born

natus es -> You (singular) were born

natus est -> He was born

nati sumus -> We were born

nati estis -> You (plural) were born

nati sunt -> They were born

Feminine forms:

nata sum -> I was born

nata es -> You (singular) were born

nata est -> She was born

natae sumus -> We were born

natae estis -> You (plural) were born

natae sunt -> They were born

Neuter forms:

natum sum -> I was born

natum es -> You (singular) were born

natum est -> It was born

nata sumus -> We were born

nata estis -> You (plural) were born

nata sunt -> They were born

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EuLebeAllIdiomas

So saying, "Stephanus in Americae natus", is not correct?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

No, it is not correct; Stephanus in America natus est is OK.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EuLebeAllIdiomas

Oooops!!! I thought for a moment that the ablative ended in -ae. Hahaha! My Latin's a bit rusty. Thanks!!

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

The ending -ae is for the genitive singular and the nominative plural.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter621029

Technically it is an adjective. It's like "The child was born = The (new)born child."

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

For French speakers, it's again a great help to understand the Latin logics:
L'enfant est né. L'enfant est blond = both adjectives. Not part of a verb.

September 12, 2019
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