1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Quomodo Corinna se habet?"

"Quomodo Corinna se habet?"

Translation:How is Corinna doing?

August 28, 2019

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Would "How does Corinna feel" work? (The owl rejected it). :( Edit - since that's how they used it in another sentence, they should add it to the accepted translations. I can't now because I just got it correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

It's not really an inquiry into her feelings. Often we say things like: "quomodo res se habet?" or "omnia bene se habent", and they certainly do not mean "how does the situation feel?" and "everything feels good", at least in the emotional sense of the word "feeling".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

No, no -- in American English (at least out here in California) when we ask how someone is feeling, it usually refers to their health. Of course we are lacking context here. If there had been a whole story about changes at Corinna's workplace and you asked, "How does Corinna feel about that?" it would obviously be asking her feelings about the new changes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdolfRoman

Remember this section its about greetings... it similar to say "how is it going"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBookLvr

Me too! I did that and got rejected. Date: 8/30/2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBookLvr

Also, You are a teacher, so I am on your side. I like school :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

I tried it and they called it wrong so I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zikiri

I similarly tried, "How is Corinna feeling?" and it didn't work. Seems like it's better English than "doing," so I'm a little confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I personally think there's a difference in the meaning. If I say "How are you?" (or also "how are you doing"?) it's a greeting, if I ask "How do you feel?" I'm trying to know if you have an headache or something. I don't think you would greet someone with "How are you feeling?", it sounds too clinical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

I agree that "How are you/is he (doing)" is more general than "How are you/is he feeling". I would only use "feeling" when I'm specifically inquiring about health.

"How are you (doing)?" -- A general inquiry that is often used as a standard greeting and therefore tends to have a standard (as opposed to a real, honest) response.

"How are you feeling?" -- I'm aware that you've been ill and I'm expressing real concern and expect a real, honest answer.

There is a significant difference in greetings in Standard American English and in British English, though. In Standard American English, "Are you all right?" is only used in response to witnessing someone have a mishap. Maybe they walked into a pole, maybe they can't seem to stop coughing. In AAVE and British English, however "[(Are) you] all right?" is just a standard informal greeting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike108631

I was thinking the same thing. For instance: Quomodo femina se habet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bikejackel

Is a more direct translation "How is Corinna?"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

I put that and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesEilen

Can someone explain the difference between Quomodo Corinna se habet and Quid agit Corinna? Don't they both mean, "How is Corinna doing?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

That's how they idiomatically translate into English: "How is Corinna doing/feeling?"

Literally, however, "Quomodo Corinna se habet?" is "How does Corinna have/hold herself?" and "Quid agit Corinna?" is "What is Corinna doing?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

There's no difference in the meaning, that's the important thing to know.
Only a literal meaning difference. How are you/How do you do = all the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaMalchus

Would the dative "ei," as in "Quomodo Corinna ei habet?" translate similarly to the reflexive "se"? Figuring these literal translations has my brain in a jumble. Would one ever use the dative case with the verb "habeo" in reference to states of feeling (How does Corinna hold for her), or only reflexive (How does Corinna hold herself)? Is habeo best left transitive?

Thanks everyone for making these lessons possible! Pretty helpful so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sodaTab

"Se" does not get pronounced when clicked on. Would that be a bug?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

No, just an omission.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReeceSwanepoel

I'm getting real confused with the word order in these exercises


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedheadedRogue

Latin word order is pretty variable - Duo doesn't have much in the way of grammar, but if you find a secondary source it should explain a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lauren328557

I do not understand the difference between " comodo Livia se habet" and "quid agit Livia"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

Colloquially they're both equivalent to "How is Livia?/How is Livia doing?/How is Livia feeling?"

Literally, "Quomodo Livia se habet?" is "How does Livia hold herself?" and "Quid agit Livia?" is "What is Livia doing?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARomanianGuy

She is doing fine, trust me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regen224928

Why isn't Corrina accepted? I keep making that typo and would like to know if there is an actual reason behind why that is considered wrong while a lot of time when I use a wrong word/ a word that doesn't actually exist, it thinks it was a typo and I get it correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

The course contributors have no control over how the correction algorithm works. That's programmed by the devs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bigfella88

How can How is Corinna doing be ok if How is Corinna going not? Same thing yeah?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

The course contributors can't think of every minor variation. The database of accepted answers is populated with the standard/most common ways of saying it, at least at the outset.

If you believe your answer has widespread enough usage to warrant being included, you can flag it after it marks you wrong (assuming you had no typos or extra spaces) and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdolfRoman

In spanish to feel can be traduced as sentir (note the se) just as "sensation"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamJan11

What does this mean?

Write this in English how Corinna I know has?

I do not know how to upload a picture. I have one if anyone knows how.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

You will need to upload it to imgur.com and link to that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

When you submit a bug report, there is an option to upload an image for the devs to refer to.

https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/articles/204728264-How-do-I-report-a-bug-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

Did Latin use question marks or other speech marks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

Thank you very much for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllemandeLeft

I admit: My English isn't the best (rather the opposite) Why does How Corinna is doing wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2610

Why is "How Corinna is doing" wrong?

Because the question is formed as "How is Corinna doing?" The statement is "I'll tell you how Corinna is doing."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaJg13

Cool! Duo had learned that!-typo

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.