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"We study the Latin language at home."

Translation:Linguae Latinae domi studemus.

August 28, 2019

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EuLebeAllIdiomas

Just out of curiosity: Why would saying, "Linguam Latinam domi studemus", not be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

studeo, studere usually takes the dative instead of the accusative for the 'direct object'. There are a few other verbs that are like that but I don't remember it being a huge amount.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

Ah. So "Linguae Latinea studeo." but "Linguam Latinam disco."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yes. "Disco" means "to learn" and so "linguam latinam" is properly the direct object.

However, "studeo" means "to direct one's attention to" or "to be diligent in" and therefore it cannot be the direct object and is therefore the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krista189497

Rae.F. why are you so fabulous and logical. thank you so much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emile_Bouwer

Thanks for the explanation. It makes sense now. :-)

Note to contributors: If "Studere" doesn't mean "Study" in the conventional English sense it would be helpful to indicate this in the Tips Section of the Plurals lesson where it currently just indicates that Studere means To Study. Thanks :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I also noticed that in the Tips they wrote, "You use vos to talk about more than one person." That's not correct. You use vos to talk to more than one person. Talking about them requires illi, illae I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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jairapetyan

Sure, they might sometimes poke a head in, but that doesn't make it a reliable way to communicate with them. It's like you see your supervisor's secretary at the grocery store every now and then, so now you regularly complain about your co-workers to the checkout clerk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AeroniusNox

Can you elaborate on this? It seems to me that you are "directing your attention to" the object of the Latin language. I dont see the distinction you are drawing. Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Can you ask your question more clearly? I'm not sure if you're asking about the distinction between "discere" and "studere" or the difference between the accusative and the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AeroniusNox

I was wondering about the distinction between the accusative and the dative. I don't understand when you say "it cannot be the direct object and is therefore the dative". I guess I'm asking what does the direct object mean? It seems to my feeble mind that "The Latin Language" would be the direct object of "studere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In English, "the Latin language" is the direct object of the verb "to study" because of how we frame it. You study something. What is being studied?
In Latin, "linguae Latinae" is the indirect object of the verb "studere" because of how they frame it. You dedicate yourself to something. To what are you dedicating yourself?

For more details, please refer to my reply to MichaelRee623268 below.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noelia_12

This is actually quite helpful! I was so confused as to why my accusative sentence was flagged as "you have a typo". This should be added to the tips & notes. Also it is a little confusing since we haven't seen the dative declensions yet at this point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelRee623268

Is there a handy guide to the basics of Latin. Coming from English, I am having a tough time with gendered words and words ending in multiple ways. Duolingo just dropped me into the language. I have been learning, but I find myself guessing far more than I should. Any shove in the right direction would be appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Click the light bulb icon before taking the exams.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation

Hopefully that will help as your introduction to the basics.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelRee623268

The light bulb!!! It was there the whole time and I never clicked on it. I probably should have been doing it the whole time but it was never pointed out to me. I have noted the other links you provided. Thank you!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam156066

Same here. This is a big help - thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

Where is this light bulb icon? I don't see it anywhere. I am using a desktop computer....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I'm also on a computer. It's been changed to the word "TIPS".

https://i.imgur.com/7gY0fgK.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

OK, thanks, I knew about the Tips.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

Latin's logic is like "you study 'on/about' something". So the object of the verb studeo takes dative case (indirect object) rather than accusative (direct object).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Not so much "to study on/about" but rather "to direct one's attention to" or "to be diligent in".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceClark8

'Studeo' is a weird word that takes the dative when you would expect to find the accusative. There are a few more


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

I wrote it that way, with the accusative, and Duo said that it was correct but had typos. I found it interesting that when I flagged this statement, because I was going to say there was "something else wrong." there was now an option for "My answer is not correct."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The course contributors have no control over the correction algorithm, which among other things decides what is a full-fledged error and what is "just a typo".

"Studere" takes the dative, not the accusative, because it literally means "to dedicate oneself to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesLatimer

Is “domi linguae latinae studemus” wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

It shouldn't be. Report it as an variant that hasn't yet been considered. I imagine placing 'domi' at the beginning stresses WHERE you study Latin, as opposed to 'linguae latinae domi studemus', WHAT you study at home.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

'Linguae Latinae domi nos studemus' was marked wrong. Why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noelia_12

I'm just a beginner, but I would think that the "nos" is wrong there. This is not a reflexive action. So the correct one would be "Linguae Latinae domi studemus"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justprettygay

it's not technically wrong! you /can/ use personal pronouns such as "nos", even though you really don't need them because the person is already clear through the predicate. this course does it quite often, actually.

i think it's marked wrong because it's a quite unusual sentence structure, and hasn't been added to the variants yet. but since latin doesn't rely on word order it works!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Is it Latinae Linguae here because it's in the genitive (the) -e ending?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, dative. "Studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Sorry Rae.F, I feel like you just keep on repeating yourself all the time. Thanks, I think I'm understanding it now. I suppose when at times we need to understand the literal meaning of a word it's turning to the Latin-English dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciusFlavius

As a non-English native, I actually have a rather English question that, what's the difference between 'study' and 'learn' (studet & discit), and what's the reason of distinguishing them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You can sit up all night studying for a test and not really learn anything. But you study so that you can learn.

You can learn important life lessons without the need to study anything. Direct experience is a good teacher. You learned your native language without needing to study.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zenigma

I've notice in previous exercises the word Linguae Latinae could exclude Language and leave Latinae by itself in the translation to english and is mark as right. However, in Latin it is wrong to write Latinae without Linguae, why? Is there a reason for that or is that just the way it is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

Hello,

"Latinae" (in dative form there) is an adjective. It needs to be "attached" to a noun (here, it is "linguae").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldSweeney

Why not linguam latinam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The verb studeo, studere takes the dative. It is more literally "to devote oneself to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmneAlmaMagnaEst

This lesson has been SO frustrating for me! Too much information that Duolingo is not providing at all. The TIPS section is not very useful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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If you have any specific questions, this is the place to ask them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/18ghayer

How do you say "I study at home" in latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Femenino singular dativo latinae


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LolinaMarrero

Domi Linguam Latinam studemus.

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