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  5. "Estne iuvenis Romae?"

"Estne iuvenis Romae?"

Translation:Is the young man in Rome?

August 28, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 179

So "Romae" is "in Rome" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Yes Romae means in Rome. It is the locative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamashi88

Woohoo! The answer to the question I was going to ask! It has been 6 years since I took any formal Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wyqtor
  • 2291

What's the purpose of the '-ne'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

It marks a yes/no question. I may be wrong, but I think Est iuvenis Romae would mean The young man in Rome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManateeLamprey

I would probably translate that as "The young man is in Rome," but yes. -ne indicates a yes or no question (although you can omit it and use intonation instead, e.g. Estne iuvenis Romae? = Iuvenis Romae est?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eey91

As non native English speaker, I learned how the auxiliary "do, does" has no actual meaning but denotes a yes/no question as well, whereas all "wh" question words imply a more extended an informative answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_in_USA

The do / does also allows us to form questions in English using inversion.

He lives in Rome. --> Lives he in Rome? (archaic to the point of being almost incomprehensible)

He does live in Rome. --> Does he live in Rome? (standard question format)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg2935

Used to ask a question, est means there is estne means is there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrew05169

Ne is an enclitic 3nding that denotes a yes or no question. Its similar to the -que enclitic, which adds an and to the word its attached to. C.f. senatus populusque romani (SPQR) where the q in que is considered the start of another word despite being part of populus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YanishRash

How do I change the sentence to "is the young man from Rome?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andy389462

Did the ancient Romans roll their Rs ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManateeLamprey

Good question. From what I've read, it's hard to know. Some pronunciation can be reconstructed with relative certainty due to misspellings, rhyming/poetic meter, etc., but I'm not sure if that applies to trilled vs. untrilled R's. Most Classical Latin pronunciation (and Ecclesiastic Latin, for that matter) calls fro trilled R's; it is my understanding that this is based on the prevalence of trilled R's in Romance languages.

So generally, yes.

But of course, I'm not an ancient Roman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupercus1

Also some classical writers have commented on pronunciation. I believe one described it as a like a growling dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

Yes, into the Tiberrrr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

It seems to me that [estne] has an excellent parallel in the English [isn't], which also expects/requires a yes/no response, uses third person form of [to be], includes an indicator for yes/no [ne, n't]. Thoughts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gale347246

Continued problem: iuvenis is masculine or feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamashi88

pretty sure that it always translates to young man/men so my assumption is that it is masc. I could be wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dangereux21

Is iuvenis an alternate spelling of luvenis? If it were changing due to subject vs object that would be the ending of the word, not the beginning correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamashi88

They are the same word? Its lower-case 'i' if it isn't the start of a sentence and upper case 'i' if it is. Therefore it is 'Iuvenis in urbe habit' or In 'urbe iuvenis habit' not lowercase 'L' and lowercase 'i'

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