"I live in New York and my family lives in Boston."

Translation:Novi Eboraci habito et familia mea Bostoniae habitat.

August 28, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bartleby

It should maybe be noted that "familia" more often refers to slaves or a family estate than to a family in any modern sense.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arquemada

Very good point

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nnikolov30

Yeah. Family is more like cognatio, or even domus.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraEdw

I would rather see cities from the classical world in the placement test. This was only my second question in the placement test, and if one doesn't have much experience with NeoLatin, there's no hope of getting it right (despite my best effort to use the locative case!).

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

I'd rather see places from the classical world in the course itself. Novum Eboracum didn't exist then, but Eboracum did, so why not use it? Less typing, too. There are loads of European towns with valid Latin names, using them would give the course more face validity.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-joseangel-

Shouldn't "ego" at the start be accepted?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

It seems like it might, but Ego was not used much, since the nominative case contains the concept within its form.
Using 'ego habeo' is like saying 'I I have'. As far as I know, which is not from an expert, 'ego' would be used in response to a question, such as 'who wants this book?' 'Ego'

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Purplesmoothie

Why are they using the "i" endings in this example as opposed to others? I'm still not getting it :(

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noahgamerrr

That's the locative case, showing where something happens.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spring692135

From what i understood, Novum Eboracum means "New York" and Novi Eboraci means "in New York", just like Roma and Romae.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

Eboracus is a second declension neuter noun. My form example for this is 'bellum' Nom, voc and acc = bellum / bella gen = belli / bellorum and dat and abl = bello / bellis. Therefore, bellum, bellum, bellum, belli, belli, bello. Bella, bella, bella, bellorum, bellis, bellis.
The locative case is not much used and usually takes the genitive form, so, in the case of eboracum, it ends with -I. (belli)

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

when I started this course, I used -que for and, which was accepted. in this example, it is refused. Is there a valid reason for this?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gooddog113

Adjectives can be placed either after the noun they modify or before - either should be labled as correct, although technically in this case, since the adjective does not refer to number, it should be placed after the noun.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

seems like genitive used as locative. áre they the same form? also is preposition "in" c ablative necessarily wrong?

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IARose
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Is there any where that gives (or any one who can give) a decent (clear) explanation of the Nomative, Locative, Ablative, Genative etc. etc case. It would be really really helpful for us utter newbies.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth771728

I'm not an expert, but here's my understanding.
Nominative is for the initiator of an action. It's like when we say I, you, he, she it, et cetera.
Vocative is only for directly addressing a person. Cato becomes Catone.
Accusative is the direct object, when an action moves from the person who is the subject, to the object that is being acted upon. In English, this would be 'the book', in 'he threw the book. 'He' would be nominative. Genative is the possessive. This is when you might say 'of the' like statua deae = statue of the goddess.
Dative is the indirect object - 'his sister' in he gave the book to his sister.
The ablative is less well defined. I learned it as 'by' 'from' and 'with' you could look at https://blogs.transparent.com/latin/how-to-survive-the-ablative-case/ for more information.
Locative, as the name suggests is about location. Therefore, 'on', 'in', 'at' and 'by'.
The 'by' in the ablative is different from the locative. Ablative 'by' is like 'by force' and the locative 'by the table'. I hope this helps. If not, try Wikipedia.

September 10, 2019
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