"Quid tibi est nomen?"

Translation:What is your name?

August 28, 2019

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpinkAju

Would "quid nomen tibi est?" be possible? Why exactly is not the verb at the end?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karol_Gherard

Yes, it's possible because what the important thing it's you use a question intonation. You also could say "Quid est nomen tibi?" and this is the most common way to say it.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaulARomoE

You should read this entry regarding the use of "quod nomen" against "quid nomen". https://www.textkit.com/greek-latin-forum/viewtopic.php?t=62864

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/metomorphic

What are some other possible word orders,please?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighprinceVader

"Quid est nomen tibi?" is something I remember learning from Wheelock's Latin ages ago.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

As it's a common sentence, it's almost an expression, so what would the most common to say it. Let's imagine Latin is not a dead language, how should we say "What's your name" to a Roman girl to sound natural?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

I don't hear an aspiration in the q in quid, but I hear an aspiration in the t in tibi!

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighprinceVader

In general, aspiration doesn't really matter in Latin, unless you're talking about the combinations pt, th, or ch.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

What do you mean by "doesn't matter"? If it's not a big matter to discuss or if it was just random in old times for Latin speakers to whether produce aspiration or not?

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

I can't help wondering how you would say 'What's a name to you?'

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What is the meaning in English?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

"What is X to you?" is asking the personal connotations and values you associate with something. Although it can also literally mean "How do you personally define X?" and shades of meaning in between. It depends on what X is.

For example, imagine a child's drawing. Now imagine you're showing it to someone and you ask "What is this to you?" Possible responses include:

"It is nothing to me." (Meaning they have never seen it before and for all they care you can throw it away.)

"I did that when I was five years old."

"My daughter made that when she was four." (If the person gently takes the paper from you and looks at it with a soft smile, this thing has sentimental value to them. They are probably going to keep it somewhere safe.)

It can also literally mean "Tell me your definition of X." For example, "What is love to you?" might be answered with "Love is accepting a person as they are and valuing their happiness."

So "What is a name to you?" is something like "What value do you put on a name? How much do names matter to you? How do you use names in everyday life?" It's somewhat practical, somewhat philosophical.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morrest

Wow... dude!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kati673185

quid es tibi - ---- the pronounciation is like this

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Would "Quid es tibi" correct, if the noun "namen" is implied (said in the previous sentence for instance)?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kappers

Why is the dative case of the personal pronoun used here? Is this a fixed expression?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighprinceVader

More or less. Another way to see it is "What name do you have?" since esse + a dative pronoun can mean a person has something. Tibi est frater means You have a brother.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leontien459003

the dative here is used as a dative of possession :)

latin does this sometimes*: you could see a sentence like "the book is for/to you" (liber tibi est) instead of "the book is yours" (liber tuus est). a sentence like that with a dative of possession essentially means "you have the book"

*I'm not exactly sure how common the dative of possession actually is in latin :/ or if it's more common than just using a genitive. but I've seen it quite often :)

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RavinDave

If you're using the familiar "tu" (tibi) form, wouldn't you already know their name?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

'Tu' is not familiar in Latin, merely singular; by the time T/V distinctions had developed, the people using them were no longer speaking Latin.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularlife

What of yours is the name IS a rare consteuction. Is there a fixed pattern for a serie of cases here? Thanks

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

"Tibi" is "to you", not "of yours".

September 13, 2019
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