"Corinna linguam Latinam discit."

Translation:Corinna learns Latin.

August 28, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

How was I supposed to know that Corinna is a Latin name? I had no idea what that first word was. At least please use proper names that are obvious. Like Julia or Livia.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chartokai

You can hardly be said to know a language without discovering a few of its names. The whole point of language learning is to embrace the currently unfamiliar gibberish.

Plus, there are no universally obvious names. Even your example of Livia was new to me. Within English alone, the phrase "Tom, Dick and Harry" expresses the common public in Britain but someone named Dick is of much amusement to many Americans.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JefDeSmedt

I guess the most famous 'Livia' was the wife of the emperor Augustus and the mother of the emperor Tiberius.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

Actually it's a Greek name borrowed by Latin. If you place your cursor over the word you'll see "Corinna", the fact that it isn't translated shows that it's a proper name.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenny2202

Corinna is really common name, specially in French "Corinne"...

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric710700

You've never heard the name Corina?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

Yes, but wasn't aware it was a Latin name. Also it first cropped up here for me doing a dictation exercise and that's what threw me. If I'd seen it in a written exercise first I'd have known it wasn't a noun.

September 1, 2019
Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.