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"Corinna linguam Latinam discit."

Translation:Corinna learns Latin.

August 28, 2019

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Echi605728

When do I you use discit, and disco


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

Disco means "I learn", discit "he learns" or "she learns".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614
pronoun verb suffix English Latin
ego -o I learn disco
tu -s you learn discis
id -t he/she learns discit
nos -mus we learn discimus
vos -tis you learn discitis
ea -nt they learn discunt

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix839568

This is awesome! Thank you for this reference, I will add these to my notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemmus_Insanus

Do I always have to use the word "lingua" when talking about a language in Latin? Wouldn't it be possible to just say "Latina", like when you say "I speak English" instead of saying "I speak the English language" every time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, you need to say "lingua Latina" because just "Latina" by itself does not imply the language. In other words, in Latin you need to say "the Latin Language" each time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amn0713

So without "lingua," Corinna could be learning about Latin culture, Latin geography, Latin food, etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Something like that. To my understanding, without "lingua", it's an incomplete thought. It would be a little like saying "She is a tall." Okay...a tall what? A tall woman, a tall girl, a tall giraffe, a tall jockey, a tall doctor, a tall hamster?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wes69754

Why isn't this "Corinna teaches latin."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

to learn: discere

to teach: docere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

It would not accept 'Corinna Latinam linguam discit'. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Oversight. Flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yevaka-18yo

it's Corinna linguam Latinam discit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Latin syntax is a little more flexible than English syntax.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sigzig

What is the difference between "study" and "learn"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

You can study without learning, and you can learn without studying. They're related, but not synonymous.

She studied for her law exam all night, but she couldn't remember anything in class the next day. She learned nothing.

The flooded bathroom made me learn my lesson: Close the shower doors before turning on the water. No studying required.


[deactivated user]

    Do know why it does not translate to Corinna Learns Latin Language.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

    Duo accepted "Corinna learns the Latin language." Yours may not have been accepted because it is missing "the". It doesn't sound grammatically correct without it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

    This translation should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    I don't think Corinna learns Latin language is proper in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

    Ah! yes. It should be "I learn Latin" or "I learn the Latin language".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonitaGons

    Why is it linguam latinam not linguas latinas.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Why is it linguam latinam not linguas latinas.

    Because she is learning "the Latin language" (singular) and not "the Latin languages" (plural).

    So you need singular accusative linguam latinam and not plural accusative linguas latinas.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cherry481380

    Are plural nouns feminine?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2614

    If a singular noun is feminine, its plural is feminine.
    If a singular noun is masculine, its plural is masculine.
    If a singular noun is neuter, its plural is neuter.

    And of course there are the different declensions.

    Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
    Latin cases, in English

    Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
    declensions 1-3
    declensions 4&5

    Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

    For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
    1st Conjugation
    2nd Conjugation
    3rd Conjugation
    3rd i-stem Conjugation
    4th Conjugation


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

    Nouns are masculine, feminine or neuter. Their plurals would be masculine, feminine or neuter respectively.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebraHerns

    Granted it's been fifty years since I took Latin in high schol. Discuit vs. docuit?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2614

    Discere: to learn
    disco
    discis
    discit
    discimus
    discitis
    discunt

    Docere: to teach
    doceo
    doces
    docet
    docemus
    docetis
    docent


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix839568

    I got the answer correct merely because I could recognize the words. But I'm still confused over the logic in Latin syntax. If I were to write from English to Latin without the scrambled words as an aide, I would not get full points.

    Someone knows a decent online book or a source to better understand Latin syntax? Much appreciated.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2614

    Language has no logic, only convention. I'm sure others can point you to good resources, but in a nutshell:

    Latin syntax is a little bit more flexible than English's is, but broadly, it defaults this way:

    Basic sentence structure is Subject-Object-Verb.
    Adjectives generally come after nouns, except for determiners and numbers. Similar grammar has survived in the Romance languages.
    Adverbs always come before verbs, although they don't have to be side-by-side.
    The conjugated verb comes last. It's a bit backwards of English. We say "I want to sleep", Latin says "Dormire volo". This is how tense endings evolved in the Romance languages.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix839568

    Thank you, I highly appreciate your detailed response.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TommasoFer934489

    "Corinna learns the latin language" should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

    Latin should have an upper case L.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

    How was I supposed to know that Corinna is a Latin name? I had no idea what that first word was. At least please use proper names that are obvious. Like Julia or Livia.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chartokai

    You can hardly be said to know a language without discovering a few of its names. The whole point of language learning is to embrace the currently unfamiliar gibberish.

    Plus, there are no universally obvious names. Even your example of Livia was new to me. Within English alone, the phrase "Tom, Dick and Harry" expresses the common public in Britain but someone named Dick is of much amusement to many Americans.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JefDeSmedt

    I guess the most famous 'Livia' was the wife of the emperor Augustus and the mother of the emperor Tiberius.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

    Actually it's a Greek name borrowed by Latin. If you place your cursor over the word you'll see "Corinna", the fact that it isn't translated shows that it's a proper name.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenny2202

    Corinna is really common name, specially in French "Corinne"...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    In English, there are some Corin I heard, but they are males.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

    It must be a different word. In (Boeotian) Greek, korinna is the diminutive of kora "young girl".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    By extensions, it also could mean "youth", but, according to Wikipedia, you're right, it's derived from the the God Quirinus, Janus Quirinus, from Quiris, a spear, (Corina could be feminin for that), but other sources prefer to see in Corin a young person.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric710700

    You've never heard the name Corina?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

    Yes, but wasn't aware it was a Latin name. Also it first cropped up here for me doing a dictation exercise and that's what threw me. If I'd seen it in a written exercise first I'd have known it wasn't a noun.

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