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  5. "Multae linguae sunt."

"Multae linguae sunt."

Translation:There are many languages.

August 28, 2019

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/French_Bunny

So many nobody on earth can count them!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think you should remove "many" from your sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

No, it's fine. "So many [languages] [that] nobody on earth can count them."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasClarke9

If only they hadn't built that blasted tower!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

7,111 to be exact :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/6tbUAUt8

Linguae can also be translated as "tongues" to yield: There are many tongues.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itawest

Would it also be correct to say "Suntne multae linguae"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

No. That would be a question: "Are there many languages?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InkBlotGlows

What's the difference between linguae and linguas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

In the plural, nominative vs accusative

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:lingua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HomerSimpson1618

Hi... what declension is litteris from? It isn't from this question but still..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

The word for "literature" is literally "letters", so the Latin word for "literature" is always in the plural.

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:littera

Litteris is the plural dative of littera. The verb "studere" takes the dative because it literally means "to devote oneself to".
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:studere

Litteras is the plural accusative of littera. The verb "legere" takes the accusative because, just like in English, the literature is the direct object of the verb.
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:legere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

And if you consider that a language is a dialect with an army and a navy, there are even more...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexandernext

Why is this in the locative case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

It's not, it's nominative. But as a first declension feminine noun, the nominative, vocative, and locative just happen to have the same form. And this particular word has no locative case. That's just for names of cities like Roma.

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:lingua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin358481

Well, believe it or not :), in Classical Latin the nominative was the same as vocative, i.e., a short /-a/ sound. The locative (place where), instrumental (with what), ablative (from where) merged (into Classical Latin ablative), which was a long /-ā/ [ah] (from earlier /-ād/). For example /schola/ 'school', but /in scholā/ 'in or at (the) school'. Since these both became just /-a/ in later Vulgar Latin and by extension the Romance languages, they were pronounced the same by that community. The special locatives such as Romae "in Rome" are archaisms preserved because of their frequency and reflect the fact that locative was earlier /-i/, i.e., Rōmae < /Rōm-a-i/.

Fun fact, just in case you are wondering why I said nominative was the same as vocative in this declension and not the other way round is because the nominative was originally a long /-ā/ (different from ablative which was then /-ād/ as stated earlier). The Classical Latin short /-a/ in the nominative is a puzzle, unless it was actually taken from the vocative which was a short /-a/ from the Indo-European times, which are by definition pre-Latin.

PS. I happen to agree with everyone here on the pronunciation: it is pitiful but so what?! Just get over it, I did. The male voice is closer to the restored (or classical) pronunciation, the female voice is more ecclesiastical or medieval. The course is fun regardless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baptizatusAudax

Isn't it clearer if the "sunt" comes first in the sentence when translated as "there are many languages"? "Sunt multae linguae"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

The default position of the verb is at the end. To put it elsewhere is to put a stress or nuance to the sentence.

sunt multae linguae would, to me, be emphasising the multiplicity of languages; both sentences valid, but with a slightly different purpose - and therefore delivery - to each.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doubledealer

what happens if you put it in the middle? So in this case "Multae sunt linguae". Is that possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

It's generally not a good idea to split a single noun phrase with a verb (or at all, really). It changes the meaning by making it no longer a single noun phrase but rather two noun phrases being equated or compared.

Multae linguae sunt = There are many languages.

Multae sunt linguae = Many [of some unspecified thing] are languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreamloomer

The audio is horrible in this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

In the ancient times, AE was pronounced as the diphthong ai (like i in fine). So the audio is more or less OK (maybe just t's are a bit aspirated which wasn't a case in Latin).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

I think a lot of people in these Latin forums just like to feel superior by complaining about the pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Well, the Latin language should sound like Latin, not like English or Spanish. Imagine some French course with audio samples voiced with the German accent or an English course sounding in a Chinese way - that's about the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

There aren't any native speakers around anymore. Everybody has an accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/French_Bunny

True. But I should add that, for an alien learner, as your octopod writing profile picture suggest you are, for an alien learner, Any terrian native should have a rather convincing latin accent, shouldn't he ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Yeah, imagine if thousands of English teacher around the world taught with an accent! Nobody would be understood! Oh.. wait...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StaryLacinnik

I dont think so. Pronuncitation is just bad in most cases here. For example here "gu" is "gv" So it should be read as an "lingva" not lingua. But in the end we shoulnt treat Duolingo as a superior lingua teacher, its just a fun app with option to learn few phrases


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's because it's classical Latin, with "u" sound, and Church Latin is with "v" sound. So, according to what I learnt here, both are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

What's the more modern pronunciation of the dipthong? (I'm more interested in ecclesiastical pronunciation.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

"mool-teh ling-weh soont"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Thank you! Is there an IPA engine somewhere on the Internet? Giving the IPA pronunciation for Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FancyFrau

But I hear a definite s in the word multae. It sounds like mus dai

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