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  5. "Mater eius sepulchrum habet."

"Mater eius sepulchrum habet."

Translation:Her mother has a grave.

August 28, 2019

95 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julianlessthan3

That's a really weird way of saying her mom is dead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

It was common to purchase a grave before you actually died in Hebrew culture. I don´t know if it was the same in the Roman world though..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Popinguj

Well, buying land on a cemetery beforehand is a common occurrence, is it not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivan351547

It was common in the Roman world, too. Gladiators and soldiers used to do it, for example. And so did emperors, who built splendid monuments being alives to be buried in them. Apologize for my mistakes. English is not my mother language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

I see only one one mistake, in alives, which should be innumerate. But if you really want to improve your English, I'd suggest reading an English book without a dictionary, the way natives do. It does things to your English skills that no schooling could ever do. I'm planning to do that to Latin once I'm done with this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivan351547

Thank you very much for your words and your advice, Tibful. You are right, reading is the best way to improve our knowledge of a foreign language. And ours, too. The problem, like always, is time. But the purpose remains, and I read as much as I can, when the opportunity arises. I hope we can go on with Latin very soon, when the course is complete. SALVE!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica-Jean

Besides reading (with one or more bi-lingual dictionaries at hand, listening to radio broadcasts in the target language are a great aid. I’m told that watching TV and movies also helps, but I haven’t tried that. There is a Latin language radio station; I think it’s broadcast from Finland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barbara489190

If you fancy something light to read, rather than a classical Latin text, I have come across Latin versions of both "Winnie the Pooh" and "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeinrichIV

I suggest to start with comics. Reduced vocabulary, simple sentences and illustrated action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CirculitaR

I have Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeinrichIV

Valuable advice. What you propose really works. Lots of tiresome work, lots of results.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GervaisFry

Me too. I have downloaded the Vulgate. Some time I may get onto real literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zac551962

Your english is good. Most non-mother language english speakers have better writing than those whose first language is english (less things like ``gr8t''or other such errors)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivan351547

Wow, thank you very much. Very kind of you. It is very interesting the fact that a relatively high number of native speakers of any language -not only English- usually don't care about correction. I see it every day in Spanish (my mother tongue), even among university students...!! I think it would be a perfect topic for research, don't you agree, my friend Zac?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

... fewer things than .....

Sorry, inner pedant escaped again...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica-Jean

As the only employee who studied to learn French, I spent a lot of time correcting the spelling and grammatical errors in notices my bosses posted on office bulletin boards.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WithNight

Ah yes my brother was a gladiator


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kele981

What a good guy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEstuardo

It still is really common in Mayan culture... In fact, they buy the wooden box and hang in in their room, really close to the roof. Specifically above their bed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria356865

Admiral Nelson always had his coffin on board with him - after all, he was likely to need one at short notice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chilokoo

I bet it's part of a daily life to purchase (wherever possible) a grave before one's dead in Asian cities. It's an investment as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTo228

In addition to the living preparing for their deaths not everyone got their own grave or tomb, you had to be pretty well off to have a personal grave, buy a plot and have masons do your memorial. You weren't allowed to be buried inside the city walls, so getting a plot on the sides of the roads leading into the city became a way to show off wealth.

For most Romans cremation was at first the norm with the ashes being kept in communal columbarium. Interment in communal tombs (i.e. the catacombs) became more common as pagan traditions gave way to Christian ones.

My takeaway from this sentence, especially given the other sentences in the lesson, is not just that someones mother is dead; but that the family made the financial sacrifices neccessary to give the mother a personal tomb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

My grandparents bought graves, and when my grandfather died, my grandmother was grateful to not have to deal with it becaus obviously, she was upset at his passing. She's still alive, but has a grave beside his for when she passes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

That is very common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazwellfan

What in the latin tells me that its her mother and not his mother?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

Nothing other than (absent) prior context; it could equally be his mother or its mother. The English is compelled to be more specific than the Latin in this regard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

Nothing. Even 'its mother' would be an acceptable translation, as eius is the genitive singular for all three genders. I would send in a report if his/its were not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaRidge

Thank you for this light bulb moment! I had been trying to conjugate eius as you would suo/a in modern Italian and was flummoxed. Your mention of the genitive has explained my flummoxation (not a real word for anyone reading this)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Golem518587

I haven't even learned what goodbye is and now there teaching me abou graves!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

The Romans used "vale" (be well) as goodbye.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You will understand later in the lesson why they teach you how to say "graves".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

Is Agatha Christie a coauthor of the Latin course? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterScham1

Eius is used for all three genders.

Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
NOMINATIVE is ea id
GENITIVE eius eius eius
DATIVE ei ei ei
ACCUSATIVE eum eam id
ABLATIVE eo ea eo
Plural Masculine Feminine Neuter
NOMINATIVE ei (ii) eae ea
GENITIVE eorum earum eorum
DATIVE eis (iis) eis (iis) eis (iis)
ACCUSATIVE eos eas ea
ABLATIVE eis (iis) eis (iis) eis (iis)

From here: http://people.hsc.edu/drjclassics/Latin/index_cards/is_ea_id.shtm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obaoill

My Latin masters at school and my Latin book primers order nouns as: Nominative Vocative Accusative Genitive Dative Ablative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2614

Ultimately, that really doesn't matter. It's just a list of the cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dougchaplin

Typically US textbooks (as far as I can see) order cases as NGDAcAb and UK textbooks order them NAGDAb - both have a logic. In favour of the US, the genitive is quoted immediately after the nominative in the lexical entry to identify the declension. In favour of the UK, most beginners learn sentences that include subject object verb before they learn other constructions so beginning the noun paradigm with nominative and then accusative fits the order of learning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

You won a lingot :) THANKS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

How did you do that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul633408

Reminds me of the humourous Irish way of proposing marraige by saying "How would you like to be biried with my ancestors"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WithNight

Wait. What? I'm learning Irish now-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerguy_pablo

Is that the correct pronunciation of "ch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonGunnarsson

Yes. "Ch" is pronounced as aspirated k in classical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.E.P.

And in modern ecclesiastical Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

2019-09-06 I had the male reader, and yes, it sounds right to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmetzner

actually, this recording sounds very clear and good to me :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/H.E.P.

The whole pronunciation issue is rather questionable really, and 'correct' arguably a matter of opinion. Personally, I find the course rather fun to listen to, but actually pronouncing Latin for several hours every day in a modern Liturgical context I follow rather different rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

Eius is both her and his?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerguy_pablo

Profecto! Same goes for ille/illa/illud("that one over there") and hic/haec/hoc("this one over here"). They all have just one genitive form, the -ius ending, making the former become illius and the latter huius.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronsje

Requiescat in Pace, o matre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panaduolingo

how can you say than his mother ? in latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If it's only "his mother" outside of a sentence, or subject of a sentence (= nominative), it's "mater eius". Same than "her mother". "eius mater", or"mater eius".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrittneyCn

It said "You used the wrong word." and gave me the meaning (Her mother has a grave) but that's it. I had no idea which word was wrong or what the correct sentence was - until I clicked discuss. Now I can see the correct sentence above. Is this the new way of seeing corrections? Kind of weird, no? (This was a tap what you hear exercise; I had incorrectly tapped Mater eius sepulchra habet)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LancelotWi1

Why is there sometimes an h in sepulcr~ words but not always? Is that a gender thing? I am very confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2614

Gender has nothing to do with it.

"Ch" is a digraph like in English, only instead of sounding like "beach" it sounds like "Bach" or "loch".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

It's weird that you write it.
It sounds like "Bach" or "loch" in the ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation, but in the Classical Latin pronunciation it sound like the english "k" with aspiration.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonSlats13

Why is it eius if it's feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dougchaplin

I'd point out that most of the time in modern English, if we don't know the gender of a person, or where the person can be of any gender, we usually use singular they, their.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMarkona

One thing I have to say is duolingo does not have macrons


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupercus1

Nor does actual Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitBilgine

"Her mother has a grave" was my answer and was not accepted as right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

Either you had a bad typo or it glitched. That is the official answer listed at the top of this page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsC14

Finally! Gothic sentences!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RevellaLeif

Some of these stories are morbid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

How would you say "the mother has her grave." please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AriHablaEspanol

Please, how do we know that the possessive "eius" refers to "mater" and not to"sepulchrum"? Would "Mother has her grave" translate differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dougchaplin

A genitive seems normally to follow the noun it qualifies, unless context strongly suggests a different meaning. So “mother has her grave” would more likely be “mater sepulchrum eius habet”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Interesting....I posted a comment on here before Julian's: It's good to be prepared and it's still not here, although the header says there are 2 comments.

Also, I had an email saying someone else had commented, but that comment doesn't appear either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

It was probably deleted by a moderator because it wasn't really adding anything of substance. Sometimes one can get away with witty comments and sometimes one can't—it depends on who sees it and when and how busy the sentence discussion is.
Personally, I enjoy reading such comments, but if a discussion gets quite long they can also get in the way of posts that are actually informative. And some are (entirely subjectively) better than others...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TriggerSmooth

What about "her mother has a sepulture" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jarvis755634

How about tombstones? Well, you know, a grave without a tombstone is a modest vessel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

A tombstone is not the grave in itself, of course.

But you are perfectly right "tombstone" is one of the meaning given for "sepulchrum"!

  • grave, sepulcher, tomb
  • mound.
  • location of the pyre, pyre.
  • funerary monument, tombstone with its funerary inscription.

I think it can also be "monumentum" for tombstone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

"her mother has a sepulchre." I believe this also should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

I believe that "her mother has a sepuchre" should also be correct. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sepulchre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon543430

how do you know when eius means hers their?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

You have to use the context which is competely absent from this sentence....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon543430

how do you know when eius is "hers" or "their"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2614

"Eius" is the genitive singular of "is" (he), "ea" (she), and "id" (it). Without context, it could indicated any of those three.

https://latin.cactus2000.de/pronom/showpronom_en.php?n=is

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Latin/Lesson_6-Pronouns#Declension_of_Is,_ea,_id:_(personal_pronouns_w/_translations)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jmes423302

Shouldn't it be "mater eia" or "mater eiae" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

"Eius" is the genitive singular of "is" (he), "ea" (she), and "id" (it). Without context, it could indicated any of those three.

https://latin.cactus2000.de/pronom/showpronom_en.php?n=is

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Latin/Lesson_6-Pronouns#Declension_of_Is,_ea,_id:_(personal_pronouns_w/_translations)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fantomius

Can this also be translated to "The mother has his grave" ?

(In other words, "eius" is applied to "sepulchrum" instead of "mater.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2614

I'm pretty sure that would have to be "Mater sepulchrum suum habet."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Than26432

Was that common in latin to speak about sacrifice or grave ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretWi931537

Why not "His mother has a grave."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uaitseq

In a classical pronounciation:

  • Māter, not mater
  • eius is pronounced with geminate i ("ey-yus")
  • -um is usually pronounced as a nasal vowel
  • habet, not hābet

Sorry for being picky, that does not mean I disrepect the work of the contributors...

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