1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Maritus cotidie sacrificat."

"Maritus cotidie sacrificat."

Translation:The husband sacrifices daily.

August 28, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaby294745

"the husband sacrifices every day" should be a valid answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BautiSili

That's what i put


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abereon26

wow i wonder what he sacrificed daily....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

He's gonna run out of sons pretty quick...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

Since he's a husband, I would assume the answer to be "everything".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boffin10

Does the Latin word refer to actual animal sacrifices, or is it more general, as in someone who gives things up for a larger good?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

Sacrifices were offered to the gods at temples and household shrines and elsewhere, and could be very simple things like oil or foods or items one valued as precious. They were not always blood sacrifices. However, perhaps less valuable things should better be referred to as offerings.... But the whole idea was to give to the gods or local spirits so that they would do you favours or protect you. "Do ut des".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaptianKaos8

So could the word "donate" also be used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boffin10

Thank you for the explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dbux16

cotidie can also mean "every day"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ina462329

The husband sacrifices daily. OR The husband daily sacrifices. Makes no difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD

"The husband daily sacrifices" says the same thing and should be accepted. I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varkentje123

That doesn't seem like correct English sentence order to me. I think 'daily' as an adverb should always be at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Daily is an adverb of frequency:
Adverbs of this type can be placed:

Either, at the beginning:

Daily, the husband sacrifices.
(Here an emphasis on the "daily" as a remarkable fact)

Or, at the end:
The husband sacrifices daily.

This is the most common, and more natural ways to order then.

https://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/adverb/adverbs-frequency/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

Agree that those are the restrictions on "daily".

However, the page you reference puts various adverbs of frequency in other positions, as in examples 3 and 4:

I usually shop for groceries on Saturday mornings.

He is often late for work.

This comes down to the difference between adverbs of definite frequency (such as "daily") and adverbs of indefinite frequency (such as "usually" and "often").

I prefer the discussion found on

https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/adverbs-frequency.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentRam2

Often I went there. I went there often. I often went there. The 3 are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoroark571

I wrote: "The husband daily sacrifices!" Why was that wrong?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huish95

"To make sacrifice" should be accepted for sacrificare as "to sacrifice" without an object sounds clunky in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

No, it's fine, because "sacrifice" is also an intransitive verb.

Used transitively and intransitively, this verb doesn't have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vivian2839

I didn't think that the voice recording sounds right, and i reported that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaneBeaton

I am puzzled, I have never come across "cotidie", rather "quotidie" although it was obvious from the options given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

Actually, this word has three variants: quotidie, cottidie, cotidie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaneBeaton

Thank you. Now I think of it I really do not know which I knew when doing Latin at school aeons ago but now very familiar with the q version from "Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Curiously, Quintilian (Īnstitūtiō Ōrātōria I.VII.VI) would have called us both pedantic (frigidī) for writing quotidie with a "q", although he admits it is the older practise.

At any rate, it should be accepted on Duolingo as it we are not trying to hit exactly Silver Age Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tc2018
  • 1038

That's not a sentence I've found in any of my other languages yet!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

Pii non sunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Curiously, I think this is the one exercise where quotide cannot be substituted for cotidie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntoniVal3

Why "daily sacrifices" is not accepted?

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.