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  5. "Male me habeo."

"Male me habeo."

Translation:I feel poorly.

August 28, 2019

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

I love how the voice actually sounds unwell.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keltic07

Maybe it should say "I feel bad" as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

That's what I put and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/j32899

Is it ok to say poorly/badly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"I feel poorly" was suggested as a correction by Duolingo to me, so it's accepted (now).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Multilingual03

No, because it is an adverb. I know that it can be said like that in colloquial language, but not here ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betty446802

"Bad" is an adjective, in this case, and modifies "I" correctly. If you say, "I feel badly" you are saying that your sense of touch is gone and your fingertips can no longer discern between velvet and sandpaper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Isn't it an adjective used as an adverb? I can't remember how to call it in linguistics (someone remembers?), but it's "adverbially used", as when you say "Je paye cher" in French, cher being an adjective used as an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nigel_a_c

"Poorly" is both an adjective (meaning "unwell") and an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/poorly

adverb:
in a poor manner or way:
The team played poorly.

adjective:
in poor health; somewhat ill:
I hear she's been poorly.

That's very strange, because I though that "poorly" was always an adverb. It seems to me specific to the English language, because I can't find other examples. Or should they say that it's an adverb, but can be used to relate to the subject, as a "copular" adverb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

There are dialects of English (mostly in the UK) where forms such as "poorly" have taken on an adjectival use. That is definitely the copula, and it is definitely an adjective.

There are dialects of English (mostly in the USA) where seemingly adjectival forms have taken on an adverbial use. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7epnfcHy5SA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

"Feel" can act as a copular verb (linking verb) in English. So, an adjective is OK here.

I feel fine.

I feel happy.

https://writingexplained.org/grammar-dictionary/copular-verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

A bit out of range, but is it possible than "feel" cannot be copular in any languages? I can't find examples of "feel" not being copular, when it relates to the emotion, or health, or feeling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mataytay69

Can we notice the way she said the sentence in the exercise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

Yes, the pronunciation is very bad. It should be ‘male mē habeō’, not ‘māle mē hābeō’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLatin

me is 1st person te is 2nd person se is 3rd person right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Joshua, yes, that's right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

100% like in French (for the singular).

Singular:
French: me, te, se
Latin: me, te, se

Plural:
French: nous, vous, se
Latin: nos, vos, se


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

Do people really say "poorly" any more?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

I think it's been mostly replaced by "I feel awful," or "I feel like death warmed over," or "I've used up all my sick days, so I'm calling in dead."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asphodelie

Absolutely, in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

not in my region of North East United States


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkDeVernon

Neither "unwell" nor "ill" were accepted here; both have been in other examples in this section. I have also just tried "sick" but that, too, was rejected... so "poorly" [a word I might use when talking to a child] it is. I have reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

If "unwell" or "ill" and the like are rejected, please flag it in-lesson and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Sick is aeger. Maybe there's a matter of degree between "unwell" and "sick".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiosMioHaceFrio

"I feel unwell" , "I'm unwell" and "I'm feeling unwell" are all incorrect apparently... Who says "poorly" ?? "Unwell" should be accepted in my opinion. Will report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Poorly is common in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiosMioHaceFrio

Maybe it's a regional/ generational thing... My family are Scottish and I grew up in the Southwest of England and I can honestly say it's been decades since I heard anyone use "poorly." Either way, "unwell" should definitely be accepted as an alternative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

A straw poll (south eastern England) among my friends, acquaintances and extended family suggests that although poorly may no longer be first choice of expression, it is alive and well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

You'd be surprised how many reports we get in the Spanish course for poorly and how many comments in the forum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

Also "I'm not feeling well" in areas where "I feel unwell" is dismissed as snob-talk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

LOL! The poor guy sounds like he really does se male habet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

Expressive, naturalistic readings are much more helpful for learning the language! Many of them sound stilted with weird cadence. I hope that, as they polish this course out of beta, we'll get many more of these.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilikeoldmen

Should "I feel unwell" be accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

Yes. If it is not, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamLangland

what is wrong with 'I feel unwell'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

Nothing. Next time, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamLangland

For info: I reported it and 'I feel unwell' is now accepted. Thank you, DL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lou458078

I can predict that I will have a problem determining when to use 'ego' and when to use 'me'. Any guidance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

The vast majority of the time a primary source document won't use "Ego" at all, as it's only used to emphasize the subject. So no worries there.

Ego is nominitive, and used only as the subject. In English, if you'd say "I" use "ego" in Latin. (Or don't use it at all.)

"Me" is accusative and ablative, and used as a direct object and object of a preposition. If you'd say "me" in English, use "me" in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

In this case, "me" is the reflexive "myself".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ionicus

"I don't feel so well, Mr. Stark."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBeatha

Is it just me or is she pronouncing male with the first vowel long i.e. māle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JHAWB

Could we say "Me male habeo"? Because we can say "me bene habeo" for the opposite feeling. Why is the structure different in this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

If it's marking you wrong for "Me male habeo", please flag it in-lesson and report "My answer should be accepted." The course contributors need to manually enter all the different variations for each lesson, and there are bound to be oversights.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria_Tuberose

Quomodo me habeo? Quomodo te habes? Quomodo se habet?

Male/bene me habeo, Male/bene te habes

e is the same as ly, added to make an adv


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bikejackel

How about just saying "I feel sick"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Maybe Æger me habeo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

There's a difference in the meaning I think. You can be unwell, because of emotional problems or whatever, without being sick (imho).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dougchaplin

"I feel sick" is standard UK English for feeling generally unwell. Duo should accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2160

You'll need to flag it after it marks that wrong and report "My answer should be accepted." That's the only way to bring it to the attention of the course contributors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dougchaplin

Did that before commenting:-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It wasn't accepted "valeo"?


[deactivated user]

    Once again, 'I feel poorly' and 'I feel bad' mean the same.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    Please use the Report Button to suggest alternative translations.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather774488

    This all getting a bit silly, there are so many synonyms for 'ill' and should mostly be accepted, we all come from different backgrounds and have slightly different English usage. Come on, Duolingo, get this sorted out!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2160

    The only way they will "sort this out" is if you flag your rejected answer and report "My answer should be accepted." Complaining in this learners forum accomplishes nothing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orangekid3

    is "male" not an adjective here? or else where does this -e ending come from


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2160

    It is an adverb. The Latin is literally "I have/hold myself badly/poorly".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wimborne

    I put i feel ill and was marked wrong surely it should mean the aame


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2160

    Next time this happens, flag it and report "My answer should be accepted." This was just an oversight on the part of the course contributors.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y0rkshire

    Perhaps, "I feel ill" ought to be accorded acceptability"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rona653904

    Can you not say I am sick since that is what it means?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

    Is "me" not 1st person, and habeo not "I have", such as "Quid fratres tui habet, Marce?" (Or something like that), therefore this is saying "I have me feel poorly"?

    I think I'm getting confused.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2160

    It's "to have/to hold". Therefore "Male me habeo" is literally "I have/hold myself poorly". "Me" is used reflexively here. Hopefully framing it like that, it makes more sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather774488

    Sorry, when I do Duolingo on my phone I don't get that option.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

    Do you use the app? In my case, Latin it is not still available.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

    The flag button used to work well but lately I've found it less responsive. I don't know whether this is a device issue, or a change in the interface design, but it does eventually work for me. It might need holding down, or it might just need time. I haven't figured out which. Maybe one or both of these possibilities will work for you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

    It told me to "Tap what I hear" and gave me Latin words to choose from. It did not say "Translate" which, of course, I couldn't do with the word choices anyway.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

    "Poorly" is a common incorrect choice in English, more acceptable in the UK


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

    Poorly isn't incorrect, it's just an irregular part of the English language.

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