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"Quis est Stephanus?"

Translation:Who is Stephanus?

August 28, 2019

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

So est is 3rd person singular but es is 2nd person singular? My spanish brain will struggle with that...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Yeah, those pesky differences in language evolution. :-P It's interesting to compare and contrast with the other major Romance languages.

Latin Spanish French Italian Romanian
esse ser être essere fi
ego sum yo soy je suis io sono eu sunt/sînt
tū es tú eres tu es tu sei tu eşti
is est él es il est lui è el este/e
nōs sumus nosotros somos nous sommes noi siamo noi suntem
vōs éstis vosotros sois vous êtes voi siete voi sunteţi
iī sunt ellos son ils sont loro sono ei sunt/sînt

I'm sure that knowing all of the Latin conjugations, not just the present indicative, could help shed a light on where the differences came from.

Latin
Spanish
French
Italian
Romanian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosfet07

Also, compare with Old Russian, which is not a Romance language but also Indo-European:

bytʹ / jésmʹ / jesí / jestʹ / jesmý / jéste / sútʹ

´ indicates the stressed vowel
' indicates palatalization of the preceding consonant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daleraka

I am, as a native Russian speaker, have to admit your profound knowledge in my language. Also the old russian is almost the same as the "new" or modern Polish, Ukrainian and the other real Slavic languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Hello Rae, what is the code for tables?


[deactivated user]

    I couldn't do it without first being forced to memorize conjugations and declensions at school:) It does sound a lot like "es" on the grainy recording, so you really have to know your conjugation endings. Maybe it's just me, but it seems kind of impossible to learn Latin solely by immersion as Duolingo does it. Happy Latin learning anyway!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

    Well Duolingo is far from immersion. For immersion you need to be doing as much as possible in the target language: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

    There are teachers who use an immersion type, or CI approach in schools and have success.


    [deactivated user]

      You're right...that totally makes sense! Maybe "immersion" isn't quite the right word for it, I just meant it would be really hard to learn Latin just on Duolingo without first knowing your forms - I mean how is a beginner going to know that there are such things as declensions and cases which decide what part of speech a word is, as opposed to English where the noun and direct object may only be distinguished by their order in the sentence? But what you said makes total sense - you're saying Duolingo isn't even as much as the immersion method. But now I'm curious...exactly what would you call the method that Duolingo uses?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

      Native speakers of Latin would pick up the forms the same way you picked up the grammar of your native language.

      As an example: I have a toddler, so he is learning how to speak. He knows how to form plurals (add an -s), gerunds (-ing), and the simple past (-ed). No one told him that, but he is utterly immersed in the language and so he has figured it out.

      The same would be true in Latin. And it is not the only language with heavy inflection. German declines its articles (as do other languages); ancient Greek had four cases and even an article to decline; etc.

      English relies heavily on word order (syntax), but many other languages rely on morphology and inflection (word form) to convey meaning. One isn't better; it's just a different method.

      As to what I would call Duolingo's method? Repetition, I suppose? It's limited in its use, but fun. I think it's great for vocabulary and learning some phrases, and to motivate you to explore other ways to teach yourself. That's perhaps its best feature.


      [deactivated user]

        That makes sense - I meant "an English beginner to Latin on Duolingo" as opposed to a native Latin speaker learning the language as a child, but what you said is also true (the amount of times I've done a poor job of explaining myself on this chat is remarkable:). I definitely agree with you that Duolingo is limited in its usefulness for learning Latin, for aforementioned reasons. Thank you for your input, it renders studying Latin over the summer a little more agreeable:). Thanks again!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

        I can't reply to your recent comment, so I'll reply here.

        So glad you are looking at Latin this summer. I teach high school Latin so feel free to reach out (christopherbhsmith@gmail.com) if you have any questions.

        Also feel free to use any of the resources I share with my students at: https://tinyurl.com/omnes-opes


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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        • 2611

        Thank you for that link. I've bookmarked it.


        [deactivated user]

          Thank you! This will be great because I took Wheelock's the year before last, so I'll be familiar with the concepts.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

          It should be ‘Quis est Stephānus?’ Due to the missing macron, the audio incorrectly says Stéfanus, tough sorry [bloody autocorrect] syllables and stress on the antepenultimate syllable. [Thanks, mosfet07, for the correction.] Stress on the antepenultimate syllable is correct, as the name is all short syllables. However: Further, the audio incorrectly pronounces the aspirated digraph ph as /f/, when it should be /pʰ/. I've flagged the audio as incorrect (again).


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

          I stand corrected with regards to vowel length.

          Pronunciation (aspiration):

          Wiktionary, your link: Pronunciation Edit (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈste.pʰa.nus/, [ˈstɛ.pʰa.nʊs]

          Lewis and Short, Gaffiot: no information on pronunciation of ph.

          How on earth I misread ă for ā, I don't know; I might have not been wearing my glasses. Any way, thanks for the correction! I have updated my answer.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosfet07

          Well, not knowing exactly how the Romans pronounced that sound, we cannot judge what pronunciation is correct (if the word 'correct' is even acceptable for Latin pronunciation which doesn't have a unified standard).

          (Just my speculations ahead)

          Given that the name is Greek and the Greeks used to pronounce it with aspiration (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phi), we could assume that the Roman nobility, familiar with the Greek language of that period, could pronounce it similarly. But what for ordinary citizens?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianH.11

          Apparently "Stefanus" is not accepted? That seems a bit on the picky side,especially since "Stefanus" is a legitimate rendering of the audio.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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          • 2611

          Translation of Names

          A little convention: we will not accept translations of names as alternatives in this course. Marcus's name is Marcus, not Mark, and Stephanus is not Stephen or Steven.

          https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Introduction/tips-and-notes


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianH.11

          "Stefanus" is not a translation of the name "Stephanus." It is a medieval Latin variant of the name.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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          • 2611

          Doesn't matter. The course contributors don't have the time or resources to add answers with name variations. His name is Stephanus and he would appreciate if you spell it that way.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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          • 2611

          In the indicative declarative, the verb normally comes last. Where does the verb normally go in the interrogative?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

          Indicative and interrogative are not words in the same category. Indicative means "the facts" and its opposite would be "subjunctive" which is used for concepts dealing with "wishes, potentials, etc."

          I believe you mean declarative vs interrogative. In the declarative, many classical authors would indeed put the verb at the end, but it could go most places.

          In interrogative sentences, you often find the verb first (in a "yes/no" question, like "habitasne in silva?") or either second or last in questions with "question words" like this example.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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          • 2611

          Oof, brain fart. Yes, that is what I meant. I am quite familiar with all the terms, I just derped. :-P Thank you.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josealzp1992

          Just to say that learning this language is amazing , I'm from Mexico and I also studying English. The way Greek and Latin, for example, sound makes it easier for me to learn.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdiWyatt

          The pronunciation is so clear and there are no silent letters, even as joiners. Do we think this is what it would sound like? If spoken?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PierreBezu1

          Quis est Spartacus


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyvrGilmar

          Wheelock says ph is pronounced like the ph in uphill, NOT eff.

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