"Matrem servamus."

Translation:We save mother.

August 28, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Servare - to save

Servire - to serve

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/versain67

thank you

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hkan652090

"We save mother." That doesn't sound very natural.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

You should see what was chasing her! Getting her down from the tree was a piece of work! (If there's no context, make some up!)

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Making up the context for me is half the fun of Duolingo. I hope they never stop with the quirky sentences.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

Yeah, should be "we save a/the mother".

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

Really, the best would be "our" as Latin often implies an obvious possessive. Context would obviously change that, but I think the most natural would be "We save our mother."

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnAlienHere

'save mother' how does this make sense?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan324467

Servare is conjugated as follows for the present tense active indicative: servo, servas, servat, servamus, servatis, servant. Servamus is the first person plural, which means it translates not to "save mother" (an imperative) but to "We save mother." Latin is a very word-poor language, and most verbs have a range of nuance and meaning. Sevare can also be translated as to watch over; protect, store, keep, guard, preserve, or any other meaning along those lines. Hope this helps!

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

Helpful insights, especially about Latin being word-poor. As a native speaker of English I continue to be amazed at the wealth of vocabulary we have to draw upon to confect just the right phrase.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenino85

It's a common feature of most ancient languages, not just Latin. Human beings had a habit of making up more words over time, it seems. And it's both a blessing and a curse when learning ancient languages. There's less vocabulary to learn, to be sure, but it makes sentence more ambiguous and easier to mistranslate, especially without context.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

It's beyond the scope of our discussion here but I'd be interested in pursuing the idea of vocabulary paucity in Biblical Hebrew and Greek and the translation issues over the years.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auoric

Why is it "matrem"?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Latin nouns change their ending depending on what they do in the sentence. Mater is a subject (nominative) and matrem is a direct object here (accusative).

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/novahostis

There is an article missing in the translation.

September 3, 2019
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