"New York is an American city."

Translation:Novum Eboracum est urbs Americana.

August 28, 2019

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

Why not 'Novum Eboracum urbs Americana est" I'm quickly getting very confused about when not to out the verb at the end.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Pseudonym_

Generally, Latin word order is extremely flexible. Seeing as this course is in its beta stage, please report the issue when it arises. I have noticed that this course either follows the sentence constructions, "[Subject] [object] [verb]," or the more English friendly, "[Subject] [verb] [object]." Truthfully, both answers are equally valid, but currently, some wrong answers are byproducts of the system. Also, kudos to you for learning Latin!

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inpwsdd

There is no set order in Latin, though most formal writers used SOV. Just report that it should be accepted and move on

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cavdberg

Word order is important in Latin as provider of emphasis.... in fact, classical Latin would be SOV. the inversion would put stress in the part which is "out of place"... so the proposed word order "Novum Eboracum est urbs Americana" would translate with emphasis something like "It is an AMERICAN CITY what New York is", to emphasize the displaced part of the phrase.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

Very well put!!

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toni913674

I just used that exact word order and was marked correct

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanMcLeod2

Based on my limited knowledge of Latin I believe word order is relatively loose in that you are not required to usually place a part of speech in a specific spot. Rather, the placement of certain words (ex: a verb at the beginning of a sentence) can imply a certain quality of a sentence. This is why Latin is a popular medium by which poetry is written, as sentences which in theory say the exact same thing have a different emphasis from each other depending on which order their words take.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliseWhitw

Me too stg

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucolaf

It would be fun if instead of using american cities and states names, (that didn't exist when Latin was spoken), they use roman empire cities names like Lutetia (Paris) or Londinium (London), in the exercises.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraSeedling

True, although York was actually founded by the Romans as as "Eboracum", so I guess it's just a clever joke. I'm not a fan of the other American stuff in this course either.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vorobyey

Agree, and why not Italian cities like Pompei etc. Both options are surely more relevant to the course.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cavdberg

I really liked Novum Eboracum, I will never ever see New York in print without remembering it.... and it is possible because York was an city in Roman times with the name Eboracum

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

I quite enjoyed learning that ''New York'' is ''Novum Eboracum''! But I get your point. MAYBE they could do a bit of both: put some old and some new ones. ''NY'' was cool to study, but ''Boston''... Not so much.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Such as: Alexandria, Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Cambridge, Carolina, Cincinnati, Colombia, Corinth, Corpus Christi, Damascus, Hannover, Helena, Ithica, Jericho, London, Medina, Memphis, Messina, Minneapolis, Naples, Nova Scotia, Paris, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Antonio, Santa Cruz, Syracuse, Toledo, Troy, Venice, Vienna

EU, IR, SCA Latin Place names

Neo-Latin place names

September 15, 2019, 8:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

A small suggestion: demonyms and geographical adjectives can be written in lower case.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

So, is "Novum Eboracum" just as valid as "Eboracum Novum?"

In other words, is the order of a multiple-word proper name rigid or flexible?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Pseudonym_

The order of adjectives in relation to nouns is flexible to a degree; so, yes, "Eboracum Novum" should be a completely valid translation. Since both words have been put the in the accusative case, the linguistic use of a noun as an object or indicating motion towards (at least for Latin), swapping the position of the adjective to be after the noun is more than acceptable. I am not sure if the course will currently or eventually accept "Eboracum Novum" as a correct answer, but I hope it does eventually.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

Thank you. I'll have to try reporting it once or twice to see if they'll eventually accept it.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Except if it's the name of a city! (or the name of something used by everybody)

I guess that if the name of the city is "Novum Eboracum", it becomes an expression, and you can't change the name.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marvin291909

Why not 'Novum Eboracum urbs Americana est" very confusing.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zoor88

Is it actually correct to start demonyms with a capital letter in Latin?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vorobyey

It is most annoying that the verb at the end is not consistently accepted by the software. It is just guesswork which order is going to be accepted

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthMauler

How does urbe changed to urbs?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison257494

Urbs is the nominative so it's used for the subject or with the second clause when the verb is simply 'est'. Urbe is the ablative, meaning 'by, with or from the city.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cey889

Super confusing. Can you please provide some examples with the explanation?

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD
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It's REALLY early to be getting into the ablative, which is why they probably didn't get into that. It's sort of a catch-all for whatever isn't caught in the other cases such as the accusative, or dative. (with regard to objects)... Latin can seem quite intimidating looking at all the declensions and verb conjugations etc., but once you get rolling in it... it'll come a bit easier.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In reality, Urbe doesn't change in Urbs, but the "normal" word is Urbs.

Ubs = nominative = meaning it's the "normal" case. Like when something is subject. The cities are beautiful = nominative.

Accusative is when the word is grammatically a complement to the verb. I make a cake. "a cake" would be grammatically accusative, as it's the result of the action verb, or the "thing" that receives, benefit or suffer from the result of the action.

To make it very simple, the ablative case can be used when you have a preposition like "by" + the word.

For instance:
"Occidit hostem gladio"
Occidit means to "He kills". "Hostem" means the ennemy, and "gladio" means by or with the glave.

If you had the "normal" word, it's not glavio, it's gladius.

I would use the nominative "gladius", if I wanted to say "The glave is very sharp" for instance.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

". . . est urbs Americanum"?

Or is the lack of sleep finally getting to me and I'm just crazy?

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom_greyblue

Another instance of Est not being allowed to terminate the sentence; this is incorrect. Latin is EXTREMELY flexible, the endings determine the word meaning, rarely does the word order.

September 10, 2019
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