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  5. "No, I do not live in Italy."

"No, I do not live in Italy."

Translation:Minime, in Italia non habito.

August 28, 2019

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

"Minimē, nōn habitō in Italiā" is correct as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles151

I slected the answer you gave above. Is there a style argument for Duolingo's chosen correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

This is because in Classical Latin was usual the order Subject-Object-Verb, not Subject-Verb-Object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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But "in Italia" isn't exactly an object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It is an object.

It's not a direct object.

It's linked (= un object) to the verb, because you wouldn't say "I live", alone.

@Rae You are perfectly right, it's an adverbial.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That doesn't make it an object.

Direct objects receive the action of the verb:
I threw the ball.
What got thrown? The ball.

Indirect objects receive the direct object:
I threw the ball to Pierre.
To whom did I throw the ball? Pierre.

"In Italia" is superficially a prepositional phrase consisting of a preposition and a noun, but its usage is adverbial. It answers the question where.

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar-reference/adverbials-place

https://www.ef.edu/english-resources/english-grammar/adverbs-place/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yrrah2

I think the important thing is the verb coming last


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denise_nise

Its the subject not object


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Except when the verb is "to be", it's often SVO.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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SVC (complement).

And in the case of "in Italia", it is neither. It is an adverbial phrase. Trivially, yes, "Italia" is the object of "in", but as a whole, "in Italia" is neither a subject complement nor an object, direct or indirect. Answering the question "where" is a different grammatical issue than answering the question "what".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, I know, but the "O" used in SOV includes also the copula, same for the predicate, we won't write SCP, because we need to be able to make the comparison between the SOV and SVO.

The "O" is non existent in this sentence, but the pattern SOV still shows the place for "S" and "V" (copula, but still marked as "V"), and the "O" still is a good place-holder for the complement. You can write it SAC, as it should be written in linguistics, it's only less clear for users here. It's not about being perfectly right about linguistics,as it's not the topic, it's about using linguistics, as a tool, to be perfectly right in Latin.

I will continue to use SVO, as it makes things visually very clear in comparison with SOV.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua678937

What is the difference between habitas and habito?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

What is the difference between nōn and and between vīvō and habitō? Is the difference between vivo and habito like the difference between vivre and habiter in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay_theLinguist

Vivo primarily means "to live", or "to be alive", like the noun vita means "life"; Habito means more so "to live in", "to reside", or "to dwell". That is the main distinction, but I think the meanings are generally close enough that they should be interchangeable (in some contexts).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

If vīvō is good enough for Cicero, it’s good enough for me: ‘In quā urbe vīvimus?’


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

This replies perfectly to my question!

I was wondering why very few dictionaries give "vivere" = "to reside".

It's not in Gaffiot, not in Lewis & Short (They are the most complete usually), not in Dicolatin, but it's in Glosbe and Olivetti. I was wondering if it was late Latin. Or if there's a shade of meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

Why do you need a preposition for this and not for "Romae habito"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

Because 'Romae' is a locative, which applies to towns/cities but not to countries. See my reply to Dan142146 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay_theLinguist

I think given that the sentence says "No" instead of "Not at all" there's a better word to use than "minime"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's difficult to translate "no" and "yes" in Latin. So, even if "minime" means "Not at all" literally, I think it can translate our "no".

https://latin.stackexchange.com/questions/1592/how-do-you-say-yes-and-no-in-classical-latin

https://latin.stackexchange.com/questions/3016/why-doesnt-latin-have-words-for-yes-and-no


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tacotank10

Am I hallucinating or was habeo used instead of habito for all these statements about residing in lessons prior to this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You're hallucinating.

habito, habitare -- to inhabit
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habitare

habeo, habere -- to have
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

what nouns have locative ir not? looks like it's used for Rome but not Italy. also home but not city.??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

The locative case is a special case which indicates a location used for cities.

Some general rules:

  • a (first declension) becomes -ae
  • us and -um (second declension) become -i

Other locations will generally get a preposition (in + ablative, we will deal with the ablative later in the course).

Domi (at home) is an exception!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

I see that the locative matches the genitive in those nouns that have it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Also, apparently, small islands.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Cities/towns, small islands. And a few words, like rus, humus, and domus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyly3221

minime, ego non habitat in Italia. Can someone tell me why that's wrong? It's my 2nd year in Latin and I know that there are manyy ways to write sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

Ego non habito in Italia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Minime, (ego) non habitat in Italia = No, (I) he doesn't live in Italy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NishthaM2004

i wrote ' minime ego in italia non habito' & it was marked wrong...why cant we use ego in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That should have been right. Next time, flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vlad_Lesnievski

Hold on. "Yes, I live in Rome" equals "Ita, ego Romae habito" Why "No, I do not live in Italy" DOES NOT equal "Minime, ego non Italiae habito" ???


[deactivated user]

    Maybe it's because I do classical Latin at school, but I would translate 'minime' as 'very little' or 'least'. Is this just me being mistaken? Also I was taught not to mix cases in Latin, unless for a place, or name, so why does it happen with 'minime'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vzellmeister

    Is it possible to use "italiae" as opposed to "in Italia"? I know by this point we havent been introduced to other declensions of Italia, but it should be accepted regardless, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

    Hard to tell. The usual rule is locative is used with certain nouns, towns and cities, and small islands. And Italy is anything but a small island. But looking at Wiktionary it supposedly has a locative, so perhaps so. I'd get more information on the locative in Latin so you can make an informed choice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fred91883

    I have studied latin for seven years at school and never seen minime as no.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lafilozofo22

    why not "minime, ego ne habito in italio" please


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaughnCas

    Italia is feminine.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

    The reason you can't use that, is because is used to negate clauses, as the opposite of ut.

    • Caesar flūmen transit, ut Italiam vincere. – Caesar crosses the river, so that [he may] conquer Italy.
    • Caesar flūmen transit, nē Pompēium eum prohibēre. – Caesar crosses the river, so that Pompey does not hinder him.

    Anyone better than me at Latin, please feel free to educate me; I’m always glad to learn.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cortrinkau

    Why is the sentence wrong if you omit "minime"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Because the prompt is "No, I do not live in Italy" and not "I do not live in Italy."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

    But Latin doesn't really have a word for "no," does it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2604

    Not directly. However, "minime" can be pressed into that service.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

    Then why not accept Cortrinkau's answer? Translating the English word for word can produce unnatural Latin. From what I can gather, "minime" almost makes it sound like the speaker is offended at the idea that they might live in Italy. The English does not express that sentiment.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

    Apparently you can indeed use non for no. It is more rarely used in formal literature, but is apparently attested in graffiti.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    It's not unnatural Latin. I think they used "no" in Latin, but not a direct "no". They have short answers meaning no, but literally meaning something else. So, there are several translations for the words "no" and "yes" (as a short negative answers), not only one.

    Like saying: Do you like pasta?
    Not really!

    You didn't say "no", but you used an indirect short expression to express the "no".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

    Why offended? but if one were to insist upon the matter, as such, MINIME would not necessarily convey being offended about living in Italy per se, but rather "offended" (if at all) by the mistaken assumption of the interlocutor, for one quick example, as is quite often the case, when asking such questions or similar, one finds that pride of identity is quite widespread, place of birth or residency counts among the elements of most people's sensitive identity.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikoVnuec

    could you also just skip the No word and write only: "In italia non habito" as an equivalent to no


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2604

    That would be "I do not live in Italy", not "No, I do not live in Italy". That defeats the purpose of learning verb-level negation vs sentence-level negation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myrichiehaynes

    Why is "ego" not in the answer?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Latin does not require the subject pronoun, although including it is not wrong. It does add more emphasis, though, like "No, I do not live in Italy."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jane393370

    why can't I say minime, habito non in Italia. All the tips I have read so far say that word order does not matter, but here it seems to, why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2604

    Word order does matter. Flexible does not mean "anything goes". The negation must come before the verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

    OK, I put this down, Minime, non in Itilia habeo. It was marked wrong. I'll accept that. But can someone tell me why? Does the non have to come immediately before the verb?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    Your syntax was fine, but the verb you're looking for is habito (cognate with "inhabit"), not habeo (which means "I have").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

    Oh, right, thank you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoebiusMac

    I thought word ending mattered more than word order in Latin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    That's a myth. Flexibility does not mean anarchy.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John481518

    Umm ... well ... yeah, flexibility does not = anarchy. But morphology, in fact, does matter more than syntax in Latin than in English. Yes, there is a standard or usual way of ordering you words in Latin, I'll except that, but you can goof around with the syntax a lot more in Latin than you can in English. In fact, and I may be wrong, but it seems to me that we get away with a lot more than we should in Duo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OPTIONALIS

    Why not "Italiae" for "in Italia"? (same as "Romae" for "in Rome")


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

    Italia does not have a locative. That's only for things that could be described as points on a map, like cities and small islands.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electricdog

    Shouldn't "Minime, Italia non habito" and "Minime, Italiae non habito" be accepted as well? After all, 1) ablativus loci does not necessaraly need a preposition 2) genetivus loci is a standart way of expressing location (cf. Romae in this very lesson)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    No. Only the names of cities, towns, and small islands, along with only a very small handful of common nouns take the locative. "Italia" is not one of these, so it does not take the locative.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasBrya955890

    Why isn't it "Minime, Ego in Italia non Habito"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    It can be, but Latin generally drops the subject pronoun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jigglymind

    why exactly is "minime , habito non in italia" wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2604

    It must be "non habito", not "habito non".

    Also, the verb tends to come last in Latin. It's not wrong to say "non habito in Italia", but it's more common to say "in Italia non habito".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Archie_Piatt

    Why not 'Minime, ego in Italia non habito'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    That is also valid, but part of what Duolingo is teaching us is that the subject pronoun is not used very often.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serafina50301

    The correct answer wasn't in the multiple choise to choose from. Please fix this


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2604

    This is not the place to report technical errors. You would need to take a screenshot and file a bug report:
    https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/articles/204728264-How-do-I-report-a-bug-

    But if you showed us the screenshot, we could help you see if it really was an error or if something else was going on.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arsonfroggy

    whats the difference between different forms of habito and when should they be used?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    They're conjugations of the verb "habitare". Please see my replies above to Stein_um_Stein, Lyly3221, and Joshua678937.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonwatchertheNW

    how come i could say habitas in a very slightly different situation but this one HAS to be habito? :(

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