"No, I do not live in Italy."

Translation:Minime, in Italia non habito.

August 28, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

"Minimē, nōn habitō in Italiā" is correct as well.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrmeda805992

I would translate "minime" to not at all, just as to avoid confusion with non for new students

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't get what is the possible confusion. "non" in English is a negative particle. It's like confusing "not" and "no". There's probably something than I didn't about understand about this matter.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

What is the difference between nōn and and between vīvō and habitō? Is the difference between vivo and habito like the difference between vivre and habiter in French?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrmeda805992

I think so about the French. Vivo is to live, as you breathe. Habito is where you sleep; your habitat, where you live. Non is an adverb, and ne is a negative conjunction which links two sentences together.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Audrey702886

Thank you!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay_theLinguist

Vivo primarily means "to live", or "to be alive", like the noun vita means "life"; Habito means more so "to live in", "to reside", or "to dwell". That is the main distinction, but I think the meanings are generally close enough that they should be interchangeable (in some contexts).

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

Why do you need a preposition for this and not for "Romae habito"?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

Because 'Romae' is a locative, which applies to towns/cities but not to countries. See my reply to Dan142146 above.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilasKristensen

It could have been nice if the verb "vivo, vivere" was accepted too. And the verb is not necessarily placed at the end

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lafilozofo22

why not "minime, ego ne habito in italio" please

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaughnCas

Italia is feminine.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay_theLinguist

I think given that the sentence says "No" instead of "Not at all" there's a better word to use than "minime"

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan82

"Minime, non habito in Italia" is not accepted. Is there a word order lesson I can learn from this?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cortrinkau

Latin has free word order--there are no real rules, though verbs often come at the end and adjectives always come after the nouns they describe. Your sentence should definitely not have been marked wrong.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cortrinkau

Why is the sentence wrong if you omit "minime"?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2043

Because the prompt is "No, I do not live in Italy" and not "I do not live in Italy."

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

But Latin doesn't really have a word for "no," does it?

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2043

Not directly. However, "minime" can be pressed into that service.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

Then why not accept Cortrinkau's answer? Translating the English word for word can produce unnatural Latin. From what I can gather, "minime" almost makes it sound like the speaker is offended at the idea that they might live in Italy. The English does not express that sentiment.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua678937

What is the difference between habitas and habito?

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2043
September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

what nouns have locative ir not? looks like it's used for Rome but not Italy. also home but not city.??

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

The locative case is a special case which indicates a location used for cities.

Some general rules:

  • a (first declension) becomes -ae
  • us and -um (second declension) become -i

Other locations will generally get a preposition (in + ablative, we will deal with the ablative later in the course).

Domi (at home) is an exception!

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

I see that the locative matches the genitive in those nouns that have it.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan142146

If "Minime, in Italia non habito" is correct, then why is "In Romae habito" incorrect for "I live in Rome"? There seems to be some inconsistencies with the way Duolingo is (mis)handling some of these translations.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felipe.pina

Even though it seems odd, it's correct. "Romae" is what's called the locative case, which applies to towns/cities and some handful of other words such domus (gen. domi) and humus (gen. humi). Italy is a country and therefore does not have a locative, thus "in Italiā (ablative case)".

August 31, 2019
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