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  5. "Ea est puella."

"Ea est puella."

Translation:She is a girl.

August 28, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marbellous

Now the Spanish "ella" makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

Surely that's from "illa", which is a different Latin word for "she".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Multilingual03

and the french elle, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorvoGerbe

Italian is evolving really fast, 100 years ago was ella, today the use is not common, is disappearing. Today is "Lei"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleijunior

And the portuguese "ela".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParisTheLoris

It's actually the exact same in Romanian! Ea (pronounced ya, as in yack)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Limaum20

And the portuguese "ela" too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aSadRichMan

And french "elle" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scriptapuella

"Ea" is unnecessary here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiscalito

But here is just the "quid" of the matter.

Ea vir est.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

How old would be a "puella" in Latin texts and culture? A little girl, a teen ager, or exactly like the word "girl"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiscalito

Stages of life among the Romans.

Men
- From 0 to 7, infans
- From 7 to 17, puer
- From 17 to 30, adulescens
- From 30 to 46, juvenis
- From 46 to 60, senior
- From 60 years to death, senex

For women, age was not the determining factor but their reproductive stage. Today we find this extremely offensive, but ancient romans were like that.

Women
- From 0 to 7, infans
- From 7 to first menstruation, puella
- From first menstruation to marriage, virgo
- From marriage to first birth, uxor
- From the first birth to menopause, matrona
- From menopause to death, anus decrepita

(Taken from https://fr.vikidia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9coupage_de_la_vie_chez_les_Romains)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissyRunyo

Super interesting, and a la chingada ese mierda, Romans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devone966005

Im assuming virgo is where the word virgin came from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Im assuming virgo is where the word virgin came from

Yes: virgo has the stem virgin- which we see in the other case forms (e.g. accusative virginem).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

So, telly classicist Mary Beard is an 'anus decrepita'. Was that as rude then as it sounds to us now? (Snigger).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxenteMani

Why not " Ea puella est" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scriptapuella

is, ea, id is a "weak demonstrative" that stands in for the non-existent third person pronoun in Latin. So "ea puella est" could mean "that female person is a girl" or "That girl exists."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

It could be.

Though when the pronoun "is, ea, id" agrees with a noun and is placed next to it, then one could mistake it for "this" or "that," I suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betti897852

I am a beginner. What's the difference between 'ea' and 'eam' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

"Ea" is the nominative, a noun case used for the subject (e.g. "The dog sees me." The dog is nominative).

"Eam" is the accusative case, used as the direct object. In my above example "me" is accusative.

In the Duolingo sentence "ea est puella" or "She is a girl" both "ea" and "puella" are nominative as the verb "est" from "to be" is a linking verb and doesn't take a direct object. Think of "to be" as an equals sign, so She = a girl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jad498154

Does Ea also has the meaning of this or that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes! But not here.

I think it's because it's a weak demonstrative, I think it means that it's used as a pronoun whenever it's possible, and it's only used as a demonstrative when it's not ambiguous that the only role is to be a demonstrative.

It couldn't be a demonstrative here.
And also, if it was a demonstrative, it would be close from the noun it modifies. "Ea puella".

Please, someone, tell me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

You’re right. It is translated as a pronoun unless it modifies a noun in case number gender, as he pointed out. At that point we translated as a form of this or that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yourmajess1

The difference in the pronunciation from the different people you hired to say these words is VERY confusing. One man pronounces Ea as "ehh-ahh" and the other man goes "eaayah" can you please get some consistency? I understand Latin is a dead language but im sure you can provide some higher quality sound bytes...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkfreud

The new guy doing the audio sounds like he's never studied Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tarjavalo

I can't hear some of the audios, anyone with the same problem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quibblesnuff

You can click an option that says you can't listen, and then that won't be a problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

Why not tu est puella?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

"tu" is you. The sentence "You are a/the girl" would be "tu es puella."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

As I see you studied French:
"tu" (singular you) for "es"
"il" (he) with "est".

It's the same here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curious_Soul

That's tu es, but ea est puella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciopaifer

what is the grammatical diference between "she is A girl" and "she is THE girl"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Without articles in Latin, that decision is made based on context, when translating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudia542162

Isn't is "Ea puella est"? As far as I know, there is an inversion in this steucture in Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiranjanDa682372

Actually its very good to learn here its very nice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecelia316866

The audio is pronouncing "ea" as "eh-ah", whereas your instructions say "ea" is pronounced "eye."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The audio is pronouncing "ea" as "eh-ah"

Right.

your instructions say "ea" is pronounced "eye."

Are you sure you're not misremembering what they say about ae (as in puellae)?

Do you have a screenshot showing the instructions telling us to pronounce ea as "eye"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecelia316866

No--thanks. I got it backwards. Ae was what I read. Oops.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleyisHot

Congrats you found this commenyt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sebasteus

You don't use pronouns on latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

You can. They are not grammatically incorrect.

They may not be often used, but they are not incorrect.

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