1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Quomodo me habeo?"

"Quomodo me habeo?"

Translation:How am I doing?

August 28, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KandaceStar17

Shouldn't this be "feeling" instead of "doing" ? You have used "ago" specifically for "doing" before, and "habeo" for "feeling". Now, you want to act like they're interchangeable ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2613

This is a conversational question, and as such it can be translated both ways into English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/j32899

The Spanish in me says como instead of quomodo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

Well, como does come from quomodo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Is learning vowel length and proper pronunciation important in Latin? Should I memorize "Quomodo me habeo" or "Quōmodo mē habeō"?


[deactivated user]

    If you only plan to read it, no. If you plan on addressing your friends and countrymen, absolutely.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vicky.LerntDe

    I think he was so inspired by the speaker on this one, that he decided to memorize. The sound quality is certainly best with this speaker's voice I think.


    [deactivated user]

      If "how do I feel?" is incorrect the tips need to suggest the use of the word "doing" somehow.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnmarkos

      When Ed Koch was mayor of New York, he used to ask his constituents, "How am I doing?" He asked the question to mean, "How do you rate my job performance?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngeloJose874927

      When should one use 'me' versus 'se' ??? My understanding is 'me' is accusative for me and 'se' is accusative for myself ???? correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
      Plus
      • 2613

      No. "me" is the 1st person, "te" is the 2nd person, and "se" is the third person.

      Bene me habeo = I am fine (Literally "I hold myself well.")

      Bene te habes = You are fine (Literally "You hold yourself well.")

      Bene se habet = He/She is fine (Literally "He/she holds him/herself well.")

      https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Greetings/tips-and-notes


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorenzoboomin

      "Me" is for myself, "se" is used when talking about another person, but when is "te" supposed to be used?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
      Plus
      • 2613

      Bene me habeo = I am fine (Literally "I hold myself well.")

      Bene te habes = You are fine (Literally "You hold yourself well.")

      Bene se habet = He/She is fine (Literally "He/she holds him/herself well.")

      https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Greetings/tips-and-notes


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayEstonSm1

      Quod ergo bonum ago? Quia concupiscentiae malae non consentio, ago bonum et non perficio bonum – et concupiscentia hostis mea agit malum et non perficit malum. Quomodo ago et non perficio bonum? - Augustine of Hippos


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristan887282

      Habeo has been used prior as "have" or "has". Why is it "do" in this case?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
      Plus
      • 2613

      It doesn't. "Habere" means "to hold" or "to keep". Different languages, different idioms. In Latin, they said "Quomodo te habes?" and "Quid agis?" -- Literally "How do you keep yourself?" and "What are you doing?" But they used those phrases the same way we use "How are you doing?" or "How's it going?" or "What's up?" And "up" certainly does not mean "do" or "go".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterWebbe3

      The female's speech is not very clear at any time


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauricio69371

      This is a hard one to me - I'm not familiar with that expression.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
      Plus
      • 2613

      In English, asking how someone is doing is asking about their well-being or what's going on in their life. It can also ask about how well they're doing on a task. ("How am I doing? Did I explain that well?") But we're focusing on the well-being aspect here because that's what the Latin means. It's literally "How do I hold myself?"

      "How am I doing, doctor? Am I healthy yet?"
      "How are you doing? I haven't seen you in a while."
      "How is she doing? I hear her dog is sick."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielSant317905

      hello i am brasilian , mas eu falo ingles, and latim, estou aprendendo latim e ingles . tenho nove 9 anos

      Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.