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  5. "Noli rogare!"

"Noli rogare!"

Translation:Don't ask!

August 28, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tc2018
  • 1036

Is the male voice a Shakespearean actor? He's really throwing himself into these declamations!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Indeed, it's really refreshing, You kind of get a faint feeling you're at the Forum Romanum for a few seconds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rich487895

Just what I was thinking. I appreciate these lessons very much but I doubt that this is what Latin sounded like in Ancient Rome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Duh! {headslap}

After all these years, I've finally worked out what Rogation Sundays are all about....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

Interrogate is also derived from that word. Got a dictionary with etymologies in my early twenties which really opened my mind to these things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Inter + rogare = probably a meaning of cross-exam.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/interrogate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendaniusFruust

Link to or name of dictionary? I too would love to open my mind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielAlmq2

Does this literally translate to "Do not to ask"? I'm trying to figure out why the construction is "Noli + infinitive"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newms34

It literally means "don't wish to ask", but this was the standard way to construct the negative imperative (i.e., the order not to do something).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

Should "Do not question!" be an accepted answer?

To me, in Hiberno-English, the order "Do not ask/ Do not question" would mean the same thing. On the other hand, "to ask" and "to question" wouldn't be exactly the same thing in other situations.

Hence this question! And thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHen85991

Would noli rogas also make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Would noli rogas also make sense?

No. You need the infinitive after noli.

Compare English "Don't be sad!" where you can't say "Don't are sad!".

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