"Tu linguae Latinae studes."

Translation:You study Latin.

August 28, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beingfollowed

Shouldn't Linguae Latinae be Linguam Latinam since they're the answer to 'What do you study'? Per example in the hints note thing for this exercise?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solidgitarius

Studere, studeo takes the dative case, it seems.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beneficium

I checked a dictionary and studeo takes dative, so it's in fact correct. Your reasoning is correct but some verbs require dative rather than accusative, so I assume you have to memorise them.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gonza244927

Excuse me but what do you mean with the "hints note"?

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patti557312

It's the box with the light bulb in it when you click on the module.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JvMachado96

Just a thought about the verb "studeo" taking the dative case: according to one of the dictionaries I use (Gaffiot, a latin-french dictionary), studeo actually means "to dedicate oneself to X", so it makes sense to use the dative case.

The word "Studium" means not only "study", but also "dedication", "application", "zeal" etc.

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arkelley71

Thanks, That clarifies things.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivan351547

Thank you very much, friend. No idea about the use of dative with this verb, I was in shock, because I translated mentally from Spanish (my mother language) , in which this verb "asks" for a direct complement, like in many other languages, so I could not expect an "indirect" complement. But your explanation is very clear. A lingot for you.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

With macrons, this would be "(Tū) linguae Latīnae studēs".

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex386369

linguae is language though!

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radek474507

is it okay from the methodological point of view to give the learner as many as six options to choose from?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Were you choosing the verb in your exercise? If so, then absolutely! It was probably all options for person/number in the present.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeming

I am growing frustrated. I am a new Latin learner. I do have a couple of Latin Grammar books for reference, and use online resources. It would be so much more helpful if at least some of these questions had an explanation of why the noun declination / ending is what it is, and why? I honestly can't make any sense of it and am just entirely guessing.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoVeganEverybody

Don't become frustrated. You will get used to it. I see that you are learning German, and in German you already have four of the cases which Latin also has. Nominative, Genitive, Dative and Accusative. Most of the times the Nominative just means that the word is the subject of the sentence. The Accusative most of the times means that something is an object. Marcus (Nom, subject) Marcum (Acc, object) vocat. Marcus calls Marcus. The second most widely used function of the Accusative is in a construction with a verb in the infinitive (Accusativus cum Infinitivo). Eg: Marcus videt me (Acc) dormire (Inf). Here the word in the Accusative becomes a subject: Marcus sees that I am sleeping. Or, more similar to English: Marcus sees ME SLEEPING. Another important function of the Accusative is to indicate movement towards. Marcus in villam (Acc) currit. Marcus runs towards the house. (Instead of: Marcus in villa (Ablative) currit. Marcus runs inside of the villa.) Now the Genitive's main function is to show possession (or rather connection or affiliation to something. Odium Marci (Gen). The hatred of Marcus. Notabene that this can also mean: The hatred towards Marcus. The Dative case's main function is pretty much answering the question: for whom? Eg: Dona nobis (Dat) pacem. Give (whom? –) us peace. Now to the other cases. The Vocative is easy to learn. It is used when directly adressing something. Salve Marce (Voc)! Hello Marcus! The ending us (in the o-declension) becomes -e, and if it is ius it becomes -i (like in Salve Juli! Hello Julius!). There are a very few exceptions (like cancellarius, which becomes cancellarie) and many words in the u-declension (that also in the Nominative end in -us). Besides that it is usually just the Nominative (eg. Senator! Senatores! Filia! Vir! Viri!). So that's easy. The Locative exists mostly for smaller places. You'll just get to know that words like humi or domi or Californiae are the Locative. You can for instance not however say "Sicilae" because Sicily is too big for the Locative. Besides that the Ablative Case is used for the location. Mater in casa (Abl) est. The mother is in the house. It is also often used to show the "from where". As in: Pater (a) Roma (Abl) (ad) Siciliam (Acc) it. The father goes from Rome to Sicily. The Ablative has many other functions. The main ones for the beginning are showing the means of something (the way how or through what something is done): Romulus Remum gladio (Abl) necat. Romulus kills Remus by the sword. Other functions of the Ablative are plenty but these are I think the most basic ones. Same goes for the other cases. If you know these you'll have a good start. I suggest that you learn the endings for each declension by heart. There are some silly but useful songs on Youtube where they just sing the endings. If that helps. So in the beginning you should be able in your head to repeat: us i o um o i orum is os is and a ae ae am a ae arum is as is. Etc. There are many prepositions that take the Ablative or the Accusative form (or they can take both and may have different meanings). For instance: ad, contra, ante, apud, inter, per, post come with the Accusative, a, ab, abs / e, ex / de / cum / sine come with the Ablative (and in can come with Ablative or Accusative, depending on whether it gives the location or the motion towards something). Also verbs can determine the cases. As in this: Tu linguae Latinae studes. Linguae Latinae is Dative because the word studere usually comes with dative. At some point this will just be natural for you, if you continue learning. There is also a book from Reginald Foster that explains all of this very easily, perhaps unlike many grammar books. It is called "The Mere Bones of Latin", if you want to check that out.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JvMachado96

Don't be too hard on yourself, friend. Not understanding things is part of the process. Whenever possible try to make questions in the forum. This course is just beginning, but we should try to cultivate an active and welcoming community. :)

Sometimes things will seem confusing, but maybe the developers simply thought they shouldn't overload the tips with information.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LacieLooWho

Why is "You study latin language" incorrect? It says linguae latinae. Why would i drop linguae?

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radek474507

Shouldn't it either be 'Latin' or 'the Latin language'? That is, not just 'Latin language' without the definite article.

September 14, 2019
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