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  5. "Novi Eboraci et Romae habita…

"Novi Eboraci et Romae habitamus."

Translation:We live in New York and Rome.

August 28, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

That sounds really expensive... o.o'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It can be either for instance, one of us (or more) lives in New York, and the other one (or other ones) lives in Rome. Or we live 1/2 time in New York and 1/2 time in Rome. Both meaning are possible without a context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josh695195

Is there a reason why "We live in New York and in Rome" is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

Flag it and report "My answer should be accepted." If the course contributors agree with you, they will add it to this prompt's database of answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeodisMMXXI

Shouldn't it in NY and in Rome, then in NY and Rome. Minor point in know, but Latin is full of them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

¿‘at New York’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2606

No. You live in New York (or Rome, or wherever).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucretius6

The locative cannot express being located at multiple locations; plural forms only exist because certain proper names such as Athenae happen to be plural. "He is at home" can be expressed by "(is) domi est" using the locative, but "They are at their (individual and separate) homes" cannot be expressed by the locative.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locative_case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dxrsam

There's a matter of semantics, not morphology

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