"Feminae otiosae litteras multas scribunt."

Translation:The leisurely women write many letters.

August 28, 2019

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

I got Feminae otiosae litteras multas scribunt. and tiles without 'many', so I typed the translation given above, but was marked wrong and told the correct answer was: Leisurely women write a long letter.

Two problems: 1, long letter vs. many letters 2, Leisurely is an adverb not an adjective, as discussed on other threads.

Thank you so much. Issue reported as error in Latin and English sentences.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

leisurely can be used as an adjective according to https://www.dictionary.com/browse/leisurely.

It sounds totally wrong to my native ears, and I would never say it as an adjective.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceA

Well you can take a leisurely trip or a leisurely bath or spend a leisurely weekend reviewing your Latin — but only, perhaps, if you are a person of leisure. :)

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4

That's right. People/objects can't be leisurely. It describes more abstract concepts: you can't touch any of the leisurely things in your examples.

This word seems to be used in a lot of the exercises and they all need to be changed. "Idle" perhaps?

I'm wondering if some of these exercises were devised by non-native English speakers, as I've also noticed "many" used in an unusual way. "They write many letters" sounds a bit off. We'd normally say "they write a lot of letters". We usually use "many" only in negative statements: "they don't write many letters".

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

I am not picky, but "leisurely women" sounds wrong to me. I would suggest "idle" or "relaxed".

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAni4

"Littera" meant a letter of the alphabet. In the plural (e.g. "litteras") it could mean a single piece of handwriting, a (single) letter (the kind you send) or literature. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/littera#Latin The Romans could be extremely literal (no pun intended) sometimes.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cavdberg

Probably a best translation would be "The idle women write many letters"... I got a strange translation as "long letter" instead of many letters. Letter can be translated as epistula but also as littera. In this case seems better assume there are many letters, than many letters in a letter.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melody431617

Without using the word bank, my sight translation was "The idle women write many letters," which seemed to me the only way to match cases for the words in both Latin and English

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

That's what I had written too, except I used DL's (incorrect) "leisurely." I'm glad to see someone who apparently knows the cases wrote my same solution. Hmmm... and now I see it's DL's solution too, at the top of this page... so their "...write a long letter" has been corrected.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

I would suggest "at leisure", rather than "leisurely" or "idle".

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

i.e. "Women at leisure write many letters," although the tiles don't currently match that.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lililil

Yes to idle women as a translation. I've heard of having a "leisurely time/dinner/stroll/[insert action here]" but "leisurely person" sounds odd to me.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceA

Hmmm. I'm not sure I've ever heard anyone talk about a "leisurely woman" (or a "leisurely man"). I tried my best with "The women of leisure..." but no luck.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

This appears in a number of sentences

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Appearing in Duolingo sentences does not make it correct. As others have pointed out, it's not used to describe people. The problem is, we understand what the course creators meant but the English language doesn't have a good equivalent. "Lazy" has a negative connotation. What would you choose, laid-back, unhurried, relaxed, dillydallying?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

https://www.latinitium.com/lewisshort?s=ōtĭōsus

ōtĭōsus in the this context means "at leisure" or "relaxing" perhaps. You could say

"The women relaxing write many letters."

It can mean 'unemployed'

"The unemployed women write many letters."

so perhaps they are writing job applications?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

I wonder if "the relaxed women" might work better than "the women relaxing"?

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanWilli390596

Yes, "women at leisure" or "of leisure" seems better to me as well.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

Somehow "women of leisure" feels like it is a euphemism for "meretrix".

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmm123

Agreed, I think "women of leisure" introduces a whole new connotation.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Wow, I see you're already at level 14, congratulations!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The9

Can multas mean both many and long?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

no, it means 'many' (multus) but agreeing with a feminine plural object (here litterās)

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/multus#Latin

Long is longus https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/longus#Latin

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jillydee1948

The English translation is not correct.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexanderling

Litteras means letters?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack960336

There appears to be an error here in the preferred response ... why not “many letters” instead of “a long letter”

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xavi.Reyes

How do you differentiate 'many letters' from 'long letters'?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

litterās longās scrībō is I write long letters; multās litterās longās scrībō would be I write many long letters. IIRC adjectives of number and size tend to go before the subject (not compulsory) so fēminae ōtiōsae multās litterās scrībunt might be better.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidZeev

I tried "The women leisurely write many letters." but it was marked wrong.

September 4, 2019
Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.