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  5. "Livia se bene habet."

"Livia se bene habet."

Translation:Livia feels well.

August 28, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JcrT247

I'm guessing the "se" is the same reflexive "se" you find in most Romance languages, and "habet" would be the third person conjugation of "habere". Does this literally mean "Livia has herself fine"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Here is the Spanish: " Livia se siente bien." "Livia feels herself to be well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesLee95

according to the given explanation, "livia has herself well" equals with "livia feels well or livia is feeling well" in meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielSant317905

parece que a mulher que tá falando vai chorar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

The H sound is missing from the narration.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorenzoboomin

So the "H" sound isn't silent like in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

Correct, it is pronounced as it is in English.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oWWOJW3948


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Līvia sē bene habet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samogitus

Interestingly, in the previous sentence ('Livia se male habet'), H was pronounced and here it is missing. As far as I understand it could be done both ways - pronounced in Classical Latin and silent in Ecclesiastical version. But this should be a course of Classical Latin. So is this a mistake or perhaps there's any other explanation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2616

My money is on mistake. The intention is to teach Classical Latin, but the voices are all specially recorded by human beings, not automatically generated computer voices.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murakel

If the goal is to teach Classical Latin, why are we encouraged away from the use of macrons on long vowels when this use is attested in the literature?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

So im guessing this is reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Livia is well, was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Quomodo habet se Livia? Livia se bene habet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Slo

Could this potentially mean "Livia is having a good time"? I'm asking because in Slovenian we would use the reflexive version of this verb for this very purpose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

I don't think so. It means she is feeling well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Livia SE bene habet or bene SE habet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

Either. Latin syntax is fairly flexible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Livia bene se habet? Is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoannaWard12

“Is feeling well” has the same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

I put "Livia is feeling well" and it was not allowed. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

The course contributors forgot to add that option to the database. Please flag it next time and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

How do I flag it please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

After finishing the lesson but before moving on to the next lesson, click or tap the little flag icon. Some options should come up from there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

Great. Thank you very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zayn232210

Isn't 'se' only used when speaking about oneself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

Ego me bene habeo. I keep myself well.
Tu te bene habes. You keep yourself well.
Livia se bene habet. Livia keeps herself well.
Marcus se bene habet. Marcus keeps himself well.
etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

Yes, 'se' can be translated as himself, herself, itself or themselves. Se habere literally means to keep oneself and is often translated as 'esse'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsmitKulsh

i don't understand this habere habit habito etc is used for doing, feeling, living etc. Can somebody explain me the logic behind this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

"Habere" literally means "to have/hold/keep". By itself it indicates possession: Domum habeo. I have a house.

The reflexive form indicates the state of the person: Livia bene se habet. Livia holds herself well.

I think you're confusing "habere" with "habitare", which means "to reside/dwell". Romae habito. I live in Rome.

HABERE HABITARE
to have/hold/keep to inhabit/dwell
ego habeo ego habito
tu habes tu habitas
is habet is habitat
nos habemus nos habitamus
vos habetis vos habitatis
ei habent ei habitant

"Doing" is another verb altogether: "agere".
ago
agis
agit
agimus
agitis
agunt

"Quid agit Livia?" literally means "What is Livia doing?" but the Romans used it idiomatically to means what we do when we say "How is Livia?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaianyOliv9

what's the difference between habet and habes ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

habeo = I have. habes = you (singular) have. habet = he,she or it has. habemus = we have. habetis = you (plural) have. habent = they have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VioletEckl1

he/she/it lives vs you live


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George785870

Why doesn't it accept "Livia is alright" for an answer? There's no indication that we're discussing Livia's physical well-being. >.>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1197

I think the verb here specifically refers to the feeling. So Livia might be alright, but she might not necessarily feel well/good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

Hover over 'bene'. He sounds exhausted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faryal365218

Whats the difference between se habet and se habes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard-IX

habet means (literally} he, she or it has. habes means you (singular) have. It would therefore not be se habes but te habes. Hope this is clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/revandiel2209

In the previous sentence, it was Stephanus bene se habet, it's the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2616

Yes. Latin is somewhat flexible and both ways are equally valid.

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