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  5. "Marcus is coming into the ci…

"Marcus is coming into the city now."

Translation:Marcus nunc in urbem venit.

August 28, 2019

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latinitas476

You can say also "Marcus nunc ad urbem venit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas1974

Does it mean the exact same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psittacus_ebrius

No, it would mean something closer to: Marcus is coming towards the city now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Good point. Julius Caesar, BG 1.27, for instance, uses ad + accusative in the sense of approaching toward: prima nocte e castris Helvetiorum egressi ad Rhenum finesque Germanorum contenderunt, "they [the Verbigine] at night-fall departed out of the camp of the Helvetii, hastened to the Rhine and the territories of the Germanians." It wouldn't make sense that they hurried into the Rhine river.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElijahSalm5

(to Andreas1974) NO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElijahSalm5

No you can't, Latinitas476, because that would mean "Marcus is coming to the city now." which is not the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam575419

Why is it urbem instead of urbe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Since there is movement we use in with the accusative urbem. This can then be translated as 'into the city' (movement into).

in urbe would only specify location. in urbe -> 'in the city' (location, no movement).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wirelizard

Is it just me, or does a cat meow in the background halfway through the individual audio clip for "Marcus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evan603064

Word order does matter in Latin. It is inflected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cipric989

You can't use in with accusative case. Can you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

You can when you are talking about movement: Here, Marcus is moving himself towards (into) the city.

When in + ablative would be used more to specify where something occurs or is located. Marcus in urbe est -> Marcus is (already) in the city.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

Would ad urbem be wrong? Does it have to be in urbem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeodisMMXXI

I thought that 'nunc' is best placed immediately prior to the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

I wondered about this too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olivetree5

Having never studied Latin formally, and only going through Duolingo in an immersive way, I'm starting to struggle with these travel lessons. I think I may have to learn the grammar formally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Good idea to have a couple of grammars of any language and work through it in tandem with DL. A good, basic place to start is Wheelock's Latin. You can use it as a solid reference tool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MotivationKing

I typed "Marcus ad urbem nunc venit" and it says it's wrong. Does the word order matter? Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The preposition ad does not mean 'into'. Ad urbem does not imply that the city is entered, while in urbem does.

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