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  5. "You live in Rome."

"You live in Rome."

Translation:Vos Romae habitatis.

August 28, 2019

128 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaby294745

There needs to be more distinction between when they want an answer in singular vs. plural second person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collin612234

I always thiught the best way to show this in a learning environment is to always say "you all." Not entirely accurate to conversations but makes a clear and intelligible distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

Just use y'all. We don't have a formal society now anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athena_Drakerav

I've noticed the pluralization of "you" in a lot of languages. Why is it bad form in English again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Standard English used to have a singular "you" (thou) but it fell out of use and now "you" pulls double duty as singular and plural. Many dialects of English have either held onto the singular you or have re-introduced a plural you (mostly the latter), because the singular-plural distinction can be useful. But the way English is taught, the Standard is held up as "superior", and non-standard as "wrong", so dialectal variations are stigmatized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You're right when you say that the English "you" is in reality a plural you, historically, (polite you, like in Spanish or French, use the plural form)

And that they re-add a plural you, when the plural you is already there. Funny.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

That's just how language change works.

Look up the history/etymology of "aujourd'hui" some time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

'You' is considered singular and plural. Many of the plural forms like y'all, you all and youse are not 'standard' and only really appear in certain areas. It's also often considered informal to use those forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy751476

Except in certain religious settings, it's no longer correct usage to use the singular "thou." There are some regional dialects that use a plural form of "you." In the southern US, the term "you all" is sometimes used. In Pittsburgh, it's "yinz," and in some parts of New York City, it formerly was "youse."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceMitch7

Don't forget "you guys" is also often used in the U.S..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris655656

Also in Canada, where it is now gender neutral; a woman can say to an all-female group of friends, "Come on, you guys, let's go!" without sounding weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpikeShroom

There isn't a proper word for it. Y'all is the closest but it's very...crude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@SpikeShroom and @Rae.F in re: "y'all"

"y'all is very...crude" versus "There is nothing "crude" about it."

1st, I am not sure Rae.F's statement refers to "y'all", as A vs B (above), but if so

2nd, please give reasons why you opine thusly.

personally, I would begin by comparing "y'all" to the plural form of you as found in other languages, such as Vous or Voi or Sie and acknowledge the Formal/Polite double usage such terms enjoy.

Another argument would be a reference to the unfortunate, but extant stereotype/generalization of those using "y'all".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@Rae.F thank you for your friendly, candid response. I accept the challenge and will answer your question. Hmmm, I suppose your use of "it" became an ambiguous antecedent [tr. from Fr.], possibly referring to American English's lack of plural you, since the rest of your post elaborated on that [possible] misunderstanding. As a Gedankenexperiment (pardon my French:), substitute "it" for "lack of plural you" (with the [mis] understanding that SpikeShroom's intention was to characterize that lack in itself as crude). The entire post would then be cohesive. however, since i then assumed "it" was, in fact, as you confirm, I asked for a reason for your opinion.

Admittedly, having a degree in linguistics (i think you previously posted that elsewhere in the forum) does not answer that question, nor does your post address the reason why you might think "y'all" is not crude. To wit, your phrase "It's perfectly normal and natural" does not provide a reason, but curiously allows more opinions to accrue, i.e. many things normal and natural can be crude. I don't mind spelling it all out. I've admired your posts in the past and have a fair degree of gratitude, as well ! me? well, I'm in confinement, my classes began last week on zoom am to pm and it's been strange. So, please I'm still curious why you (and SpikeShroom) hold the opinions you do. Again, lest ambiguity prevail :), the historical account you provide does not constitute a basis for your aesthetic (?) judgment (?) of "y'all" as crude or not. As it stands, both parties have given unsubstantiated opinions (not proper "judgments"). Additionally, (will this ever end?? :) ), the fact that "y'all" is not a universally accepted 'natural' evolution of the language seems to prove false your characterization of "how language works" (dialects? regionalisms? slang?), especially since this particular point (lack of plural you) in the history of the English language does not culminate in the expression "y'all" -- as you said "sometimes". I gave 2 possible reasons for thinking it crude. I can also say 1 quick reason off the cuff for why it is not crude -- the opposite end of the previously cited negative stereotype (tobacco chewin cow-poke) is the stereotype of Southern elegance, the upper class who speak with a Southern (american) accent and use "y'all" in that cultural context. I think you are claiming "it's not crude in virtue of its linguistic function," which is commendable, but since it is devoid of cultural context is located outside the limits of the discourse initiated by SpikeShroom and thereby prompted my query. Sorry to think it through by writing, but we didn't see until now that your post was outside the limits of the discourse. As a linguistics major, you're in a better position than me to state this in the proper terminology. That would be a splendid result of all this fussy cogitation. i hope you will. Yours truly, R


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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There is nothing "crude" about it. English used to have both a singular and a plural "you".
Thou - singular/familiar
You - plural/polite
We somehow lost "thou", and these days we're filling the gap because distinguishing singular vs plural is sometimes useful. That's how language change works. It's perfectly normal and natural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barbara489190

Just to add to the 'singular or plural you' debate, "romae habitas" is accepted as correct. This seems to be similar to what happens on the Spanish course, where it generates just as much comment.

What I think is catching me out (and by the seem of it, many other users) is that the model answer is in the plural, so it seems as if that is the only acceptable solution. However, Duo isn't actually insisting on either singular or plural, but just expects the learner to be consistent within their translation. So, when I put "vos romae habitas" it was wrong because I'd started with the plural you "vos" and then used the singular you in the verb.

I wonder if there is any way for Duo to offer more than one suggested answer? In this case, the singular and plural versions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

I wonder if there is any way for Duo to offer more than one suggested answer? In this case, the singular and plural versions.

That would be a question for the site devs, since that's a coding issue. It might be complicated, though, since you wouldn't want to confuse early learners with a plural suggestion before they've gotten to that lesson. I don't think it could differentiate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edslave85

This was the comment I was looking for. It is really frustrating and it blocks learning. Really hope Duolingo fixes it. The same qith word order (which is not important in Latin or Russian for that matter).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

Saying that word order doesn't matter is somewhere between an overstatement and a myth. Relative flexibility does not mean it's a free-for-all.

Also, when Duolingo wants to force the plural, they do specify. If you tried the singular and it marked you wrong, you probably had an error somewhere. Next time, please copy and paste the full text of your answer so that we can have a look at it and see what's going on.

And now for my helpful little macro:


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@Rae.F Thank you for all your helpful posts.

The above links for declensions 1-3 and 4&5 are in-browser jpg files. The links below are to the same source as downloadable PDF files if desired:

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_1_0.pdf

and

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_2_0.pdf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edslave85

Maybe I overstated the word order thing, but although some stuff has been updated since Beta, there are still mistakes in Duolingo, very simple basic stuff that you learn at school (when taking Latin). There is no plural indentification from English to the language learning. Haven't seen it anywhere (yet). From Japanese, Latin or Russian to English it is easy, but when there is a sentence with "you", it is just guessing which to take and hope for the best (sometimes it is accepted both). I always check the answer Duolingo gives, to what I entered and I only comment (like now) when I know Duolingo is wrong. Yes, sometimes I make mistakes (like typo's), but for those I don't come to the comment section. In Russian there are also many errors when it comes to word order. I have shared some of the "wrong answers" with Russian and Ukrainian friends and they were all surprised it was wrong. Duolingo isn't flawless and in some ways too strict (I saw somewhere a comment they can't take all variants in consideration, sure, I get that). As I said before on Facebook, Duolingo is fun, but in no way a good learning app. Missing too many tips/lessons and diving into some stuff before proper explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Origin5world5_

It is the same problem with all languages teaching from English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbrahamSar

The more I keep going the more I feel I need a proper introduction to Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tre_mojosa

I had a year of it in high school and did well with it, but I'm getting slammed on these early lessons. I like that a lot of this is functional, day-to-day language though, rather than translating Caesar or something. It would be pretty cool to actually start talking in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

This is why I was hoping this would be Vulgar Latin instead of what they are teaching, which is Classical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J3zbo6Nq0VYj

How about Classical, but with Vulgar nouns added, for fun? Like telephone, telephonum, airplane, aeroplanum (thanks, wiktionary).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I dream about sentence including "phone", just for the fun, and to show off with these things with my friends.

I like both, modern and ancient texts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

thanks ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TWKlRYqNvs

it explains my post to your overview in re: ablative subsuming the instrumental.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy751476

Here is a 10-lesson overview, using ancient texts: https://lrc.la.utexas.edu/eieol/latol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeefMcHugeLarge

At this point I am getting really tired of just having to learn from mistakes. There should be some sort of video or text introducing new words and rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaBeaty75

Latin in my Android app doesn't have the lightbulb icon. I thought it was because it was still in beta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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I just checked and I don't have the lightbulb for Latin in my Android app, either (although I have it for other languages). This is why I use the desktop website most of the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimACRowden

I suggest you do NOT click any Duolingo link if you are using the app on your phone.

On Android it will see the "duolingo.com” reference as what's called an 'intent' and re-open the Doulingo app - and, of course, blow away your current position in your current course/skill.

DAMHIK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy751476

Why is "In Romae habitas" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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"Romae" is already the locative case. You basically said "in in Rome."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy751476

Thank you. I thought it was a question of "habitas" vs. "habitatis."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinterinKo

I'm really confused, why is "you live in Rome" Vos romae habitatis, but "you live in Italy" In Italia habitatis?

It's just really frustrating to get the question wrong, answer it the way it tells you to on the next go around but you're still wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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The locative is only for the names of cities/towns, small islands, and a very small handful (like literally not more than five) nouns. Italia is a country, not a city or town, so it needs in + ablative.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33840770?comment_id=35426015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kati673185

plural or singular? -


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

vos is you plural, like vous in French


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avi_an_Avian

auch ihr auf deutsch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bogracs1

Why "Romae" and not "Roma"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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Cities and towns (among a small handful of words) take the locative instead of in + ablative.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

Where the heck did "vos" come from? I've only seen 'tu' for 'you' so far


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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"Vos" is the plural "you".

English Latin
TO INHABIT HABIT-ARE
I inhabit ego habit-o
you inhabit tu habit-as
he/she inhabits is/ea habit-at
we inhabit nos habit-amus
y'all inhabit vos habit-atis
they inhabit ei habit-ant

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

But it didn't ask for "all of you/y'all live in Rome" It asked for you live in Rome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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It would help if you had copied and pasted your full answer so we could see it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

How would I know that?

It asked for me to write the Latin translation of : "you live in Rome" (not you all or even y'all) so I used tu -and yes i see others had a similar issue but wasn't sure if it was my issue or duos.
I know now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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How would I know that?

Now you know for next time. People often have typos or other errors that they miss, and insist their answer was correct. By copying and pasting your full answer, other pairs of eyes can take a look and see what's going on. And doing it that way ensures that we see exactly the answer that got submitted, not a re-creation that might be right this time or have different errors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2608

Either ought to be accepted. Are you sure it marked you wrong and didn't just say "Another correct answer"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

@RaeF - perfectly sure. It gave the "wrong" took a heart away and gave the right answer with 'vos' with a red background ...

I mean I'll know now, or to try it and flag it if there is a next time but it is confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1188

How would I know that?

Either remember/memorize or copy your answer or screenshot it when it's marked wrong.

wasn't sure if it was my issue or duos

That's exactly why we need to see what you exactly put.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

@AVAX3M - Don't know why I can't reply to your response so here's the reply:

Your response really doesn't make any sense considering that I didn't ask how to do it, I asked how was I supposed to know to do it beforehand?

Beyond that, I wrote literally exactly what it asked for anyways... so I did do exactly that "...remember...your answer..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizz862920

@RaeF - Indeed I do. Except I could see what the "error" was. Hence my previous question of 'where the heck vos came from'.

The question asked for "you live in Rome" into Latin.
I used Tu and habitas but it wanted vos (and habitatis) - my issue wasn't that it was wrong - it was that the answer word came out of perceivably nowhere. There was no indication that the sentence meant more than one 'you'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dragonfly1076

So... How am I supposed to tell if this is 'you' or 'you all'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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The English can go either way. Therefore the Latin can equally be "(tu) Romae habitas" or "(vos) Romae habitatis".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dragonfly1076

OK, thanks. I see by the comments here that there are a lot of others having trouble with this. Both answers are not being accepted. But at least now I know that both answers are indeed correct. Thanks for the help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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If you have typed it correctly and it is marking you as wrong, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chanflower

Why is word order strict on this one? Why not "Vos habitatis Romae"? I reported it, but if I'm wrong I'd like to know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

It's not wrong. The course contributors can't think of every variation in every lesson, which is why they depend on us to report things.

I just received an email saying that they have added "Vos habitatis Romae" to the database. It will take up to a few weeks before that update goes live, however.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelChe78706

Can I say "in Roma" instead of "Romae"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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No. The names of cities/towns take the locative, which means they do not use in + ablative.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33840770?comment_id=35426015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reine_K

Latin, to me, seems a lot like French. I only say this because they too conjugate words (I'm sure it's the same in Spanish). However, I wish that I would learn the conjugations before trying to put words in these sentences. Trying to take notes is very hard (and I would also like to know the infinitives)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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That should not be surprising. French and Spanish are two of the languages that Latin turned into. The other major Latin-based languages are Portuguese, Italian, and Romanian, although there are others.

As for figuring out the infinitive, I just Google "conjugate Latin xxx" where "xxx" is the form of the verb I know.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EGO33K4U

We still use "vos" in some countries with Spanish language. "Vos vas a ir" (You will go) but "vos" is informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Eva16_

Excuse me, why it said "habitatis" in place of "habitas"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgnacioGon869578

So "In Roma habitas" is wrong because it should always be in the locative case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcoBurak

Regarding the lack of plural 'you' in English: In southern Ontario, Canada, some people say 'yous'. It's an interesting, very localized thing-I haven't heard it anywhere else in Canada. Extremely informal and usually met with disapproval.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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New York has "youse" and Pennsylvania has "yinz".

Really, though, what English lacks is a singular "you". Once upon a time it was
I am
thou art
he is
we are
you are
they are

Just like our kissing cousin Dutch, the plural verbs are all conjugated the same way. And like French, which is in the same sprachbund with English, "thou" was singular and informal while "you" was the plural or the polite singular. Eventally the use of "you" overtook "thou" and these days we seem to miss that distinction, so different dialects have their own way of differentiating between "you" in the singular sense and "you" in the plural sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anupam349151

I have never encountered the word 'vos'. How can anyone answer it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reine_K

Thanks, that link is really helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@marthe137 Thank you for the link.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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Table format is a little easier to read:

Singular Plural
Nominative tu vos
Genitive tui vestri
Dative tibi vobis
Accusative te vos
Ablative te vobis

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman_Gladiator

How come there is a vos?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

To test your knowledge of which verb conjugation to use for the 2nd person plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septillion

Why Romae, and not Roma?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

The names of cities, towns, and small islands (along with a very small handful of nouns such as domus and rus) take the locative case with no preposition.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobFaubion

Habitatis in never mentioned in "tips" for the "greetings" skill. I primarily use those as notes to study and without it being there, I had no prior knowlege that would have allowed me to get the answer correct. I in fact still don't know the rules concerning plural second person inflection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abhi333man

why not "in romae habitatis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

Words that take the locative do not take prepositions.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allkindsofgeeky

I would like to und understand the reason why - “You live in Italy.” <—> “In Italia habitas.” But, “You live in Rome.” <—> “Vos Romae habitatis.”

Thanks in advance :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

The locative case has limited usage. Only the names of cities, towns, and small islands (along with a very small handful of common nouns) use the locative. Everything else uses a preposition with the ablative.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faryal365218

Whats the difference bwtween habitatis and habitas? They both give the same translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

It's like the difference between "I am" and "we are".
"Tu" is the singular "you" and "vos" is the plural "y'all".

English Latin
TO INHABIT HABIT-ARE
I inhabit ego habit-o
you inhabit tu habit-as
he/she inhabits is/ea habit-at
we inhabit nos habit-amus
y'all inhabit vos habit-atis
they inhabit ei habit-ant

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Focuslucky

Romae habitas'" they mark correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

Yes. "Habitas" is the "tu" conjugation, which is the singular "you". In English, "you" pulls double-duty as singular and plural, so either interpretation is valid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neverwitch

Why add the Vos? I thought Romae already means "in Rome"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@everyone_who_cares: "vos" is the Latin 2nd person plural, or as other Moderators' posts correctly indicate: "Vos is the plural you", which is universally accepted, whereas 'vos' is NOT the "optional subject pronoun y'all", because of this latter being a non-Standard, crude, unacceptable expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

"Vos" is not a preposition. It is the optional subject pronoun "y'all".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kai840814

Thanks to all for these long super useful commentaries helping me in Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

you can also find it in Duolingo TIPS before each Duolingo lesson !!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerrellWad1

You should make distinction such as "you all" for plural and you for singular. I know in common parlance it's not how people speak however we are not in real conversation with context so distinction such as"you all" for plural is necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SugoiSan

Why are they asking stuff I haven't even learnt yet even once, and that too in the typable answers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert485433

@SugoiSan [ @Mrs Excellent ]

You can find it in Duolingo TIPS before each Duolingo lesson !! copy paste from TIPS:

Plural verbs Subject Esse (to be) Habitare ego sum habito tu es habita-s is, ea est habita-t nos sumus habita-mus vos estis habita-tis ii, eae sunt habita-nt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgnacioGon869578

In Roma habitas is wrong because it is obligatory to use the locative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

That's right. The names of cities, towns, and small islands, along with a small handful of common nouns including "domus" and "rus", take the locative with no preposition.

Please refer to my other comments above for a list of explanatory links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

Please either open the answer to accept both plural and singular forms of "you" or specify with the use of parentheses which case is required fornthe answer.

The point of learning a language is NOT memorizing the specific sentences in a lesson in order to pass, but to understand the words and word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

You seem to be addressing the course contributors. They cannot monitor all of these discussions for feedback.

That said, both the singular and the plural are accepted. From now on, please either copy and paste or take a screenshot of your full, exact answer so we can help you see the real reason you were marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

When you submit an answer and it gets rejected when it should be accepted, report it.

What exactly did you put? I haven't had any issues with singular vs plural 'you' except when the course first came out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jorken1

Is "Romae" in genitive? If so, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

It looks like the genitive here, but it is the locative case (which is only used with names of cities, towns, small islands and a handful of other nouns like domus), hence 'in Rome'.

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