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  5. "These are olives."

"These are olives."

Translation:Hae sunt olivae.

August 28, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Hae olivae sunt should also be accepted - it is the form we've seen when translating from Latin to English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jbostock03

Yes, just report it if it isn't accepted. It doesn't matter where the verb is, but usually Latin follows a SOV word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

Usually. But when the verb is "esse", there is no object, just a subject complement that is also in the nominative. To avoid ambiguity, the syntax is often SVC in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

I did report...and I've just typed the same thing again (forgot I had this before). I wonder if there's a reason it is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It takes time. Maybe several weeks sometimes, to get accepted once it has been added, and it get times to also to be added to the database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

That's what I wrote, but after I wrote it, I realized that it looked like, "These olives are," rather than, "These are olives." But it didn't mark it wrong, it just said that I had a typo, and gave me "Hae sunt olivae" so I guess they accepted your error submission.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShayanaStar

Isn't this case accusative? So wouldn't it be "olivas"? Please correct me if I'm wrong, I may have misunderstood...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

Are/to be and sum/esse are copulas. There are no object and no action in that sentence. The copula corresponds to equality and does not require accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShayanaStar

Oh, I think I understand! So just for clarification, if it’s a verb state of being, it would be the nominative case, but other verbs would require accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

Yes. You understood correctly. Other verbs require accusative.

But a small number of verbs require other cases. E.g. "studere" requires dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShayanaStar

Ok, thank you for clarifying!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon235428

Thank you, this is veey helpful!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMcAyRuo

How is there no conjoined Ae in the latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2616

That did not exist in Classical Latin. That didn't come until much, much later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauricio69371

When to use "hae" or "haec"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2616

"Haec" is nominative feminine singular, "hae" is nominative feminine plural.

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/adjective:hic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ari621784

Just for the amusement (or trying to tease some coherence out of it).. using the verb "habitare" would mean the olives are dwelling somewhere???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan837467

I thought olive means olive oil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamDeTours

The DuoLingo Latin team is awesome. But it would be helpful if all the words were pronounced. Im not sure what the rule for that is, but please consider expanding it to all words. It would help to make small corrections in my pronounciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan837467

The word is "pronUnciation". And I agree!

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