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  5. "The boy studies in the city."

"The boy studies in the city."

Translation:Puer in urbe studet.

August 28, 2019

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgaristova

is "puer studet in urbe" also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Yes, though probably less conventional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmorre2

I thought that one of the cool things about Latin is that word order didn't matter so much because so many parts of speech are conjugated compared to modern language. And what do we base conventenality on when so much of the Latin we know is from literature?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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And what do we base conventenality on when so much of the Latin we know is from literature?

If I'm not terribly mistaken (and I welcome correction if I'm off-base), Classical Latin (what we're being taught here) is the form of Latin that the scholarly and literary writers of the era used, and therefore follow/set the standard convention in question.

Vulgar Latin, on the other hand, as the name suggests is the form of Latin commonly spoken (as we were able to piece together from non-scholarly/non-literary writing). This is the form of Latin that the Romance languages derived from.

The particular form of Latin that Duolingo is teaching us is ostensibly Classical, but how this plays out is up to the course contributors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Latin syntax is much more flexible, and I did point out that his translation was correct, though less common.

I am not sure what you mean by "what do we base conventenality on when so much of the Latin we know is from literature?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LegoGuy87

Word order is flexible, but sentences with the verb at the end is the normal prose the Roman would have used, other word orders are for emphasis, usually for the last word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Axel639397

Yeah, that made me a bit confused. Sometimes they don't put the verb at the end here on Duolingo in some of the sentences. From what I learned from my teacher for two years studying old school Latin, is that you put the verb at the end. I don't know if there's a difference in medieval latin or latinitas serior, but maybe two years doesn't get you anywhere...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorvoGerbe

For remember Urbe and Domi, in italian I think to Urbano/Zona Urbana and Dominio, and honestly i think the two words are the evolution of these two, if they aren't, well they just help me a lot to memorize!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, it's a good way to memorize, and it comes from domus/domi, you're right. Dominus = master of the (family) house.

Dominus gave "domaine" in French (the area owned by the "dominus"), and domain in English (borrowed to the French). It also gave "dominant" in English and French (having the leading and powerful characteristics of the Dominus/master)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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This is inspiring me to look up the etymology, and apparently it's unclear whether the "dom" in "dominate" and "domicile" come from the same root or different roots.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dominus#Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Domi = at home, so maybe urbi = in the city. I mean if you don't need the 'at', do you really need the 'in'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Urbs does not use the locative case (urbi is actually the dative form of urbs). So we have to use in + ablative (in urbe).

Domus is one of the few nouns that isn't a city, town, or small island that has the locative available.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Correct on all counts!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sproff

As I understand the proposed answer is incorrect, since "studeo" is not correct verb. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/studeo#Latin This verb obtained the meaning "to study" only in medieval time. The verb "disco" is more appropriate here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Gives new meaning to "disco inferno".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

What's the difference between urbs and civitas? I tried in civitate and it didn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaCasa0

Urbs refers more to a city in a physical, geographical sense. Civitas has more political, state connotations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennie628550

Why do they require a preposition here but don't give it as an option for the other sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It would be helpful to know which other sentences you're referring to. For example:

Danielconcasco

domus is one of a handful of words that take the locative case. That's why it's domi and not in domo.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33824857


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WittySofa

I put "puer in oppidum studet" and got counted wrong. Is this because an oppidum is seen as smaller than a city? Is a town usually considered smaller than a city? I mean, now that I really think about it, I guess a town is smaller than a city... I dunno- what do you guys think?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Aside from the differences between an “oppidum” and “urbs,” there is the matter that the preposition “in” takes the ablative case so it would be “in oppido.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaCasa0

Well, in can take the accusative, it just has a slightly different meaning than in+abl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WittySofa

Yeah, definitely. In + acc. not the meaning here, though. That would be "into/onto- motion towards." It's slowly coming back to me- hopefully it comes quicker, since I'll be taking Latin again next semester.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Here it takes the ablative though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IlonaPalot1

Dear Duolingo, please correct the verb of studeo, and change it to disco, discere. That is: discit!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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This is a user forum. The course contributors do not read in here for feedback.

"Discere" means "to learn" and takes the accusative when there is a thing being learned.
"Studere" means "to study" (literally "to dedicate oneself to") and takes the dative when there is a thing to which one dedicates oneself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshua.gra2

Why is it 'in urbe' but not 'in domi'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because not a lot of words have the locative case. Only the names of cities/towns and small islands, along with the words "domus" (house), "rus" (countryside), and "humus" (ground/earth).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

Both express the same idea: location. But the word “domus,” along with other words like the names of large cities, islands, etc take a case known as the locative, which doesn’t use a preposition.

“Urbs” and most other nouns simply use the ablative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ireplied

Puer urbe studet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No. Only the names of cities and small towns take the locative. The actual word for "city" requires in + ablative.


[deactivated user]

    I just got of the hook with the wrong case as a spelling error! I said "urbem" as opposed to "urbe" and they counted it right! I suppose that's because they don't teach you about declining nouns right off the bat, but it's kind of annoying when I know I should have been counted off! Duolingo is helpful overall for vocabulary, but I think I like parsing stories better than short sentences:)!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    The course contributors have no control over the correction algorithm. It's a delicate balance of very complicated coding and sometimes it's more forgiving than it should be.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magister_Smith

    As Rae said, you're often allowed one spelling error if it's an extra or omitted letter, I have found.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    It's true that "urbem" is one letter off from "urbe", but it's supposed to catch if the mistake is a real word and mark it wrong. It doesn't always do that, though.

    The one letter off can be, for example, urve, urbem, or urb if the target is "urbe".


    [deactivated user]

      Yep, that makes sense:) Thanks for the input!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabbitfighter13

      Does the word order matter?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      It's more flexible than it is in English, but it does matter. There's the default way, and there are ways that emphasize different aspects.

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