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"Quanti olivae et crustula constant?"

Translation:How much do olives and cookies cost?

August 28, 2019

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewD.H

hard to inderstand speakers enunciation, couldn't hear "et" listening four times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I wish they would put the speaker icon here so we could listen to it too! I had this as a multiple-choice task and didn't get to hear the recording at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonGunnarsson

Seems fine to me. "Et" is not supposed to be clearly and distinctly enunciated, just like English speakers don't usually fully enunciate "and".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustBoboThanks

But they do enunciate "and" if they're trying to teach someone English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

I find it very hard too, and he clearly doesn't say olivae et, but if you listen carefully, there is a t. It's like olivāed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I couldn't hear the "et" neither.
An ellision here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claire867508

Same! It's annoying isn't It?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

The "et" sounds clear to me. /kwánti olíwa-et krústula kónstant/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tales.F

why can't you use definite articles in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

You should be able to (How much do the olives and the cookies cost?). If it's marked wrong, report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikEseg

i just reported the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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How much do the olives and the cookies cost? is one of the accepted translations. You must have had an error somewhere in your answer. From now on, please either copy and paste or take a screenshot of your full, exact answer so we can help you see the real reason why it marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David928483

Shouldn't it be "quantum... constant"? "Quantum" should be an adverb here, not an adjective - therefore being invariable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I'll have to leave someone else to answer that, it is my question too. I would guess that quanti is to ask "how many," and it is implied that you are asking how many coins the goods cost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

Quanti...constant uses a genitive of price/value, roughly equivalent to the phrasing "have a cost of how much?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Thank you! I was totally confused, as I though it would be "quantorum" (plural genitive). Because olives AND cookies, or that "quanti" was the plural nominative, as it could be.

But "Quanti...constant" is indeed a fixed expression:

https://glosbe.com/en/la/how%20much%20does%20it%20cost

Between singular "Quanti constat" and plural "Quanti constant", only the verb does change.

So, it makes "quot" (how many) and "quantus" (how much, how big, what quantity) both invariable.

There's also a "quantus" declinated, but not when it's in this "how much does it cost" expression.

For instance, in "Quanta est audacitas tua? (How large is your audacity?), Quantus is declinated according to "audacitas".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

But olivae and crustula are not in genitive, but in nominative plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David928483

Trying to make up for the mess I have generated, I went to check on my old high school Latin grammar book. Apparently, in Latin, with verbs like emo (I buy), vendo (I sell), veneo (I am bought), conduco (I rent sth to sb), loco (I rent sth from sb), redimo (I redeem), aestimo (I evaluate), sum/sto/consto (I cost - case at stake!) prices should be always expressed in ablative... except for the five adverbial genitives tanti, quanti, tantidem, pluris, minoris. In light of this, "quanti... constant" seems therefore correct. Sorry!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Don't be sorry, you helped us very much, with your question, David!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Ah, I get it, the genitive is quanti.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBallan

Did the Romans have "cookies"? Could there not be a more appropriate translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claire867508

I feel that this course doesn't really reflect Roman life. Though to be fair Latin was the language used in other countries right up to the sixteenth or seventeenth century by the Church and Legal profession. I think 'pastries' would be better. Much more European.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

Is it better to memorize declensions and case endings or to just learn the idiosyncrasies of each word through study of vocabulary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConchiCastillo

'How much are the olives and the biscuits?' is surely also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I didn't hear the "et", is it me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonGunnarsson

After a word ending in a vowel, the "e" in "et" is usually silent or at least reduced.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanHawFost

Why is it "olivae" not "olivas". I thought the accusative plural was olivas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

We need the nominative here; "olivae" is part of the subject of the sentence. (Something isn't costing olives; the olives are costing something-- they're doing the costing.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

I answered "How much olives and cookies cost?" and it was marked incorrect. Why is it wrong without "do" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norto

Because, without 'do', it is incorrect in English. The sentence is a question so you need to add do. Without do, this will be correct, if and only if it is a subordinate clause, for example, "I want to know, how much xxx costs."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Thanks for answering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

In older forms of English, you might have said, "How much cost olives?" Today, that is not standard English anywhere in the world (that I'm aware of), though it's common enough to hear from non-native English speakers. Especially in questions, you need to use the helper verb "do".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlo522814

Il Latino purtroppo è da abbandonare. Le traduzioni soon tutte fuori luogo. Tutto da rifare. Va modificato.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelost

Should not "crustula" be translated as "cookie"? According to wiktionary "crustula" is nominative singular and "crustulae" nominative plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

The word we're using here is "crustulum," which is a different, though closely related, word. The plural of "crustulum" is "crustula" ("cookies").

As you can see from the Wiktionary entry for "crustula", that word does not mean "cookie"; it is a different word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelost

Ah, I mixed those two words up. Thanks for clarifying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkKnight134678

Why is it wrong to use "the" before the olives? (How much do the olives...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It should be okay, but it's possible you had some error or typo you didn't notice. From now on, please share the full exact text of your answer so we can help you see the real reason it marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseLalo8

Many and much are synonyms. I putted Many instead of Much, sorry if I had a mistake; english is not my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Many and much are synonyms.

They do have similar meaning, but as Rae.F has said, they're used differently. Since we're just talking about a price generically here without actually specifying countable items like "dollars" or "coins," the price is an abstract uncountable concept and we say "How much?"

english is not my native language

Unfortunately, you might not find much success on this course if you don't have a good command of English grammar. Duo is only a machine, and it isn't really set up to allow for grammatical mistakes very well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No.

"Many" is for countable things. He does not have many books.

"Much" is for uncountable things. He does not have much milk.

"Cost" is an abstract concept. How much does something cost?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikEseg

I wrote "How much do THE olives and THE cookies cost?"

That is even more correct - what do you opine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

That's also a correct translation. (I wouldn't say it's more correct than Duo's translation though; both are perfectly fine in the absence of context.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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They are equally valid. Neither is "more correct" than the other (and that's a strange concept). They just mean slightly different things.

How much do olives and cookies cost?
What's the price point in general? What price range should I expect to see when I look in this store or that store?

How much do the olives and the cookies cost?
These specific olives and these specific cookies--how much will I be paying for them when I get to the checkout line?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnAlienHere

I mean, this sentence doesn't really make that much sense. I mean I know what it's trying to say. But why can't we use definite articles? Makes this sentence sound very `beginnerʼ-ish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I just found the juxtaposition of olives and cookies a little bit odd...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Not for me, they are food. I can go to the market, and buy strawberries, toilet paper, and meat, and ask for the price, because no labels on those particular items.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Both are possible in English.

How much do olives and cookies cost? = olives and cookies in general.

How much do the olives and the cookies cost? = Those particular ones we see in the market.

Both are accepted by Duo, normally.

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