"Who is the father?"

Translation:Quis est pater?

August 29, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna_Conisbee

Would Quis pater est work?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionasky

and if not why not?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

It would, and it should also be accepted now, but unfortunately it takes some time for the changes we make in the Incubator to be active for users (sometimes as long as two weeks).

Still, please report (with the button in the lesson, not in the discussion) if it's not accepted, it's still possible something got missed!

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girv98

yes, latin has free word order so any variation is possible

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

That's not always true, there are some rules. For example, when you ave "in urbe", you can move the unit of meaning, but you can't split the prepositional phrase.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarleVVLL

While Latin is more rigid than classical Greek, I don't think it's impossible, especially in poetry, to have a split prepositional phrase. I'll keep an eye out for specific examples.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigJThomas

It's very common to see it split with a genitive or other dependent word, just like saying "to my father's house". "Inter" sometimes comes between two nouns ("eos inter et nos", "between them and us").

In poetry, of course, things are even more variable, and you do indeed find prepositions separated from, or placed after, their nouns in different arrangements than those few I mentioned above.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigJThomas

Yep.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElijahMN

You are the father!!

September 1, 2019
Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.