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  5. "Femina pecuniosa psittacum i…

"Femina pecuniosa psittacum iratum habet."

Translation:The rich woman has an angry parrot.

August 29, 2019

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Why are all the parrots angry? Have they eaten all the aspirins?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

The parrots are pining for the fjords.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

'E's not pining, 'e's passed on!

And it, would seem, p*ssed off!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seven675935

I'm not sure, but all the parrots I've seen have also been drunk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cr0fters

What does duolingo have against parrots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

Why have cats, dogs, horses & chickens when you could have drunk parrots, thrown fish, clever weasels and non-flying peacocks?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreamloomer

How exactly is it connected to the "Food" topic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Only one, delicious way to deal with an angry parrot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xMcAyRuo

say sike right now YOU S H O U L D.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queen-Rina

Throw it on the floor with all the fish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LGFreeRock0828

I'm not sure I want to know the answer to this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Well, maybe she will eat the parrot later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philippus_Nerius

If pecunia is "money," does it follow that a literal translation of "pecuniosa" could be "moneyful?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26
  • 1038

Wondered the same thing. And whether it's exclusively money, or also assets (riches?) Pecuniary = relating to or consisting of money. Peculated, peculating. to steal or take dishonestly (money, especially public funds, or property entrusted to one's care); embezzle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

The common word for "rich" in Latin is dives, divitis, which (as far as I am aware) has no Romance descendants. Pecunia derives from pecus, pecoris "cattle," which was an important source of wealth to agriculturalists.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711

The parrots again? Duo, I know several people who can help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silja208296

It's an angry bird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

psittacus meae puellae mortuus erit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

My girl will have a dead parrot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

'erit' is the future of 'est' rather than 'habet'...

have one more go!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Erit is indeed the future of esse, but when you use the dative with it, meae puellae (which, whether you meant it as the dative or not,it still can be) it has a possessive meaning. As in, 'a dead parrot is to the girl'

You can read more about it here if it's a form you are unfamiliar with. It's quite common so it's good to know and expect: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/dative-possession


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

Nick, I apologise for this: you have clearly invested a lot more time than is merited and was intended:

it is Genitive rather than Dative and is a mild parody - no pun originally intended - of a well-known work by a well-known Roman poet; he would surely appreciate Dickinson's advice, but I have kept largely true to his words.

For the record: the parrot (sparrow) of my girl will be (is) dead.

it was just a very quick swap to bring a familiar bird-based poem to current relevance but now olet lucernam and any humorous element may long have passed...

however, the commitment shown been most admirable and appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

G. Val. Catullus. (BCE. 84-54).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

Interesting. What poet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

No, please no, no mooning over Lesbia’ sparrow. I had more than enough of the wretched bird at school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

And now we understand why the parrots are important.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JooPaulo255808

I think Duo needs some help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cr0fters

My favorite sentence- I have a deceitful and drunk parrot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThOwen12

The rich woman has a drunk* and angry parrot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

No doubt drunk and deceitful as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingotLover1

She better watch out...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I wonder why the poor parrot suffers from bad temper. Perhaps every time the rich woman says "Salve, psittace!" to him it comes over as a hissing, spitting sound and he is enraged. :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mafatu

Mrs. Merdle here somewhere and I didn't know about it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azim6102

The pecunious woman wasn't accepted. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DahlS.

I never knew how common pissed off, drunken parrots were in ancient Rome!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daesun135

I think that "dives" is more common


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Did she give it the fish sauce instead of the wine?

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