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"Teacher Corinna reads Latin literature."

Translation:Magistra Corinna litteras Latinas legit.

August 29, 2019

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silvaIguer

When is it "literis latinis" and when is it "literas latinas"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

You use litteris Latinis with studeo and other verbs needing dative; you use litteras Latinas with lego and other verbs needing accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Varilytie

Afaik, dative hasn't been covered in the course yet (this is the lesson titled 'School'); we've only done nominative, vocative, locative, and accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria57953

I have the same question .please give us a comprehensive answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

This has already been answered just above your comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Capitalization is a bit strange. If we're trying to recreate classical age Latin, there are only capital letters. As it stands the correct answer uses English rules for capitalization in a language other than English. (For example A German speaking doing that to all nouns would be marked wrong on a paper written in English.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think reconstructed Latin has been anglicized a lot. (my opinion)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

Neither did ancient Latin contain the letter G or U.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

That's not really true. The G was introduced very early on. The v and u were the same letter, written a Vu in upper and lower case respectively.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela872862

Am I going mad or is this much more advanced than the previous lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alelolelola

I think its harder too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielMa616492

I put Latinas litteras instead of litteras Latinas. I was taught that in general, word order is not the most important, but in this case is there a specific reason the correct answer has litteras in front of Latinas? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thom112240

Usually adjectives that describe nationality come after the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In Latin an adjective can come either before or after a noun, e.g. vir bonus or bonus vir "a good man", although some kinds of adjectives, such as adjectives of nationality (vir Rōmānus "a Roman man") usually follow the noun. The adjective may also be separated from its noun by other words, especially in poetry.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

The forms of latina lingua literally make no sense.

And there seems to be no consistency.

Accusitive or dative... singular or plural dont seem to matter, or match the tables when I look them up.

I would flag them, I don't know enough, I'm here to learn. This is beyond frustrating and confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Lingua latina" means "the Latin language" and doesn't fit here. You need just the adjective "Latinas," which is going to take that feminine accusative plural ending "-as" to match with "litteras." There's no irregularity here.

Can you give specific examples of other sentences you're confused about? The only real inconsistency I can think of that you might have encountered is with the verb "studeo," which takes a dative object (rather than accusative). So you'll see things like "Corinna linguae Latinae studet" or "Litteris Latinis studes." But the words "Latin-" and "lingua" are themselves entirely regular and consistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Please don't flag them. The exercises are all correct.

Reading the sentence discussions helps. At this point, they have been discussed thoroughly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esme183718

I keep confusing litteris for litteras, its so hard to tell the difference!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Litteras" is accusative; "litteris" is dative or ablative. I think the only place I've seen "litteris" in this course is with the verb "studeo," which takes a dative object. But you would also use it after a preposition that takes the ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Magistra Corinna legit litteris latinae" and "Magistra Corinna legit litteras latinas" both are accepted by Duo!

Litteras is plural accusative, Litteris is plural dative.

I don't understand why dative is also considered as correct here. Someone knows?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Umm, ...legit litteris Latinis seems to be a mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esme183718

I think legit is meant to go at the end


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Why is it in the plural and not the singular, if it's just Corinna that reads Latin?

Why -as instead of -am?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Because litterae (literature) is always considered plural in Latin. It mentions that in the lesson tips in the vocabulary subsection of the "School" lesson if you're on desktop. Kind of like how "scissors" or "trousers" are always plural in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

Littera means letter, litterae means literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanamTraho

I find the English sentence to be a bit awkward. I had to read it twice to make sense of it. I'd prefer an appositive separated with commas in the English version of that Latin sentence: "The teacher, Corinna, reads Latin literature."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csi

I think "magistra Corinna" is a bit more like "sensei" in Japanese. A form of address rather that "the teacher". That's how I read it, anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/randompersona542

When do you use Latinas with capital and when do you not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

It's just a matter of preference. I prefer spelling it with a capital L. Just be consistent in your spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Varilytie

So... "Magistra Corinna" means 'Teacher Corinna' and not 'Corinna's teacher'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Yes. Both nouns are in the nominative, so they refer to the same person: Corinna is the teacher. "Corinna's teacher" would be "Magist(er/ra) Corinnae."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trev373409

I understood that word order in a Latin sentance was unimportant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loona420

How am i supposed to know when its literris latinis ans when its literras latinas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas211

"Corinna magistra" sounds more idiomatic than "magistra Corinna."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CleoWhite-

I didn't capitalize latinas, and I got it wrong. I feel like that shouldn't matter as much, and I should get it right? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Duo doesn't mark you wrong for just a capitalization error. Most likely you had some other issue with your answer that it marked you wrong for. What was your entire answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBehun

WHY IS THE ACCUSATIVE IN THE PLURAL AND NOT IN SINGULAR?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

A "littera" is a single letter of the alphabet. Latin uses the plural of this word to mean a collection of letters, which forms literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DermotMcInerney

Magister is wrong. Duo should be aware of this as nouns do not change gender, whereas adjectives do. Duo persists in treating a noun (magister) as an adjective which it clearly is not. Nouns are masculine, feminine, and neuter in Latin and don't change.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

This is magistra, a first declension feminine noun. It's not wrong.

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