"Voi tenete la porta chiusa di notte."

Translation:You keep the door closed at night.

April 19, 2013

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/marliner

"you leave the door closed" or even "you have the door closed" should also be accepted here.

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tmac876

In the description of chiusa, lock is the second option. So, how is "You keep the door locked at night" incorrect?

April 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2080

I don't think it should be; one would specify "chiudi la porta a chiave" (lock the door with the key), but "la porta รจ chiusa" can mean both "the door is closed" and "the door is locked".

April 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tmac876

Grazie. I have no problem getting these answers wrong on duolingo...it makes one think anyway so I really appreciate you taking the time to answer some of my questions, especially the way Italians actually speak and what the phrases mean. So, grazie di nuovo.

April 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A

[QUESTION]

Would it be the same, "with the key" = "con chiave"?

May 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenColle

I am dumbstruck by the rejection of that answer, the same as yours!

March 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Overlordspam

Why is "di" used here as opposed to "a" for at?

January 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenColle

I agree with a bad translation. We would say "We keep the door closed (locked) AT night (nightime).

March 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Overlordspam

Well... I answered my own question with a touch of research. Di is used in some particular grammatical constructions and di notte, di sera, d'estate, seem to be just a few. Here's the site I found the information on, rather handy! http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare157a.htm

March 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A

[QUESTION]

In the Occupation chapter of Italian Duolingo, I've found that the particle "di" can also mean "in the". E.g: Il postino lavora di mattina--the English translation said that "The postman works IN THE morning".

So, which one is correct? Or, is this case just an exception?

May 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kerflumpy

Are you concerned with the English or the Italian? It is English that is inconsistent here: we say IN THE morning, IN THE afternoon, but AT night.

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cjsegninir

Can it be you "have" unstead of you "keep"?

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2080

Only in Southern dialects, perhaps because of Spanish influence. But not in "standard" Italian.

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren

Thanks. Tenere is really one of those 'false friends' if you start from Spanish. (Not if you start from French of course.)

August 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/crescere

why did I loose one heart by choosing both translations" closed" and "locked"? Is there such a big difference between the 2 words?

December 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

There is if you're trying to open the door without having a key.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinzia47

why can't it be "Keep the door shut at night"?

August 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/miki1932

I heard Duolingo says " de notte" like the Roman dialect.

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/K2mission

"You" is understood in English and the translation, "Keep the door closed at night. " should be accepted. Reported.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NRizel

We should "brainstorming" a bit, can't always rely on the word indicators anyway. Sometimes, duolingo rules

November 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Han_og

"you keep the door closed of a night" should be acceptable, as I understand it "of a __" to show frequency isn't too colloquial

September 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Donna_Diana

I have never heard anyone say "of a night" and I am a native English speaker (US). You would say "at night. "

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren

I guess it's British, and somewhat (or very) old-fashioned. Read P.G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) and you'll come across it.

October 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Donna_Diana

Actually I have seen it in writing. I just meant people don't actually talk that way in normal conversation.

October 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren

Ah, agreed. If I said it, I would actually feel like a Wodehouse character (which I enjoy doing, occasionally).

October 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/NRizel

I can imagine that..

November 2, 2014
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